Sexting: Know the Facts | Teen Ink

Sexting: Know the Facts MAG

September 15, 2009
By Katie Bachman BRONZE, Auburn, New York
Katie Bachman BRONZE, Auburn, New York
1 article 0 photos 0 comments

High-tech has created a new low. The term “sexting” is a combination of the words sex and texting, and refers to the practice of sending sexually ­explicit photos electronically, mainly by cell phone. The incidents of sexting have dramatically increased in the past few years; 20 percent of teens said they had sent a sexting message, according to a 2008 study commissioned by the National ­Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy and Cosmogirl.com. Though many in our generation are taking part, few understand the serious consequences of this irresponsible fad.

Recent advances in technology have revolutionized the way we interact socially. Cell phones and e-mail have changed the way we communicate but have led to dangerous and ­destructive behavior. While some teens may think sexting is fun or harmless, this new craze can have devastating consequences. When a photo or video is sent to another person, privacy is lost forever. The content can be broadcast to anyone. The original sender has no control once he or she presses “send.”

The consequences of sexting can be ­severe, ranging from embarrassment to ­imprisonment or worse. Explicit photos or videos forwarded from person to person can cause embarrassment for the original sender. Many teens don’t realize that once they hit “send,” control of who else sees that compromising photo is now completely up to the recipient. You may think you know your friend, boyfriend, or girlfriend, but can you trust them forever?

Many young people who thought sexting was a harmless game ended up having their lives destroyed. In one tragic incident, Jesse Logan, an 18-year-old from Ohio, was mercilessly humiliated after explicit photos she had sexted to a boyfriend ended up circulating among her peers. She eventually killed herself.

Imagine being convicted of the crime of child pornography and serving five year’s probation. You are rejected by colleges, lose your friends, and have to move because your home is too close to a school. You’re unable to get a job, and you have to register as a sex ­offender until you are 43. That’s exactly what happened to Phillip Alpert, a Florida 18-year-old. He ruined his life by circulating nude pictures of his girlfriend (which she had sent him), by texting them to his friends, her friends, and her family. The legal problem: she was only 16 and a minor; distributing explicit photos of a minor constitutes child pornography. The real problem: like many teenagers, he did not understand the long-term consequences of his actions.

Sexting may seem like harmless fun, but teens should think twice before hitting the “send” button. There is no turning back once a message is sent.



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This article has 186 comments.


on Oct. 22 2009 at 12:58 pm
well i aqree with this artical. Nd mynetshepher. but then aqain teenaqers will do what they want reqardles. nd parents are not always around to protect them. but other that then that i aqree with this artical. sextinq is qoin to happen even if we try to prevent it.

on Oct. 21 2009 at 4:49 pm
You all never got a picture

on Oct. 21 2009 at 4:18 pm
This article is true, I love it, and the fact that its telling the straight up, truth about the consequences

on Oct. 21 2009 at 4:11 pm
This article is true, I love it, and the fact that its telling the straight up truth about the consequences And what could happen if you send things like that

on Sep. 17 2009 at 5:00 pm
Right On!! Parents must protect their kids from the dangers of the net, cell phones, etc. visit www.mynetshepherd.com

on Sep. 17 2009 at 12:22 pm
DaphneDances BRONZE, Raleigh, North Carolina
2 articles 0 photos 1 comment
This article is complerely true, I love it, and the fact that its telling the straight up, truth about the consequences.