In Transit: Is it Really "Pitch Perfect"?

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In Transit is Broadway’s first a capella musical.  Using no instruments other than their voices this talented sixteen person cast takes over the stage in the Circle in the Square and encapsulating the audience with its rhythmic tunes and modern feeling.  This show takes place in the subway of modern day New York City.  Advertising refers to this show as “a love letter to New York City”.  This show follows four different storylines that all intertwine at the end.  The first character we meet after the opening number is Jane played by Margo Seibert.  Jane is an aspiring actress trying to make it in the acting world.  She has an agent named Trent played by Justin Guarini who is engaged to fiance Steven played by Telly Leung.  They cope with the many challenges of being accepted in the eyes of Christianity.  We also are introduced to Nate played by James Snyder who is unemployed going to many job interviews.  His sister Ali played by Erin Mackey is dealing with something that all girls may experience in their lives.  Getting dumped by her boyfriend.  Throughout the show, these characters meet with a man known as the Boxman (who also beatboxes) played by Chesney Snow who is the narrator and tries to help each of these characters with their many problems. One stand out from the ensemble is Moya Angela. She gave a top notch performance belting long notes and carrying many group numbers making them successful.  Overall I would give this show a 6 out of 10. It’s a new kind of musical and I respect the fact that Broadway is willing to take risks on new types of shows other than the standard show they have been putting on for many years.  The show is only one hour and thirty minutes long and I believe that it hurt the show overall. The plot and the storyline was severely under-developed and writers were going in too many directions with the many storylines and could have benefitted with more time because everything was so rushed at the end and I didn’t get the full picture.  The songs were definitely the stand out of this musical because of course, they are all a capella.  The opening number packs a huge punch because the moving assembly line on the stage used throughout the whole show functioned as a subway and you saw how easily the actors adapted to the assembly line.  Also, the featured Boxman added a sense of musicality to the rest of the cast.  He kept the rhythm and every number he was in made it very interesting to watch.  Not to mention James and Margo’s incredible solo numbers. So overall was this musical "Pitch Perfect"? I don't believe so, it lacks growth and development of the characters that the show desperately needed. It also lacked the unique spark that a Broadway musical should have and I don't know if the fact that the musical is a capella is responsible or if it is the book the actors were given.  Apparently, most agree with this view and the show has also set a closing date on Broadway that is yet to be announced.  The implication of this passage is that looks can be deceiving; don't believe everything that is advertised because you never know what the outcome is.






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