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The Magnifying Glass

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By , Chappaqua, NY
Author's note: Roosevelt is my high school. All the characters in this play are my friends and peers. Granted,...  Show full author's note »
Author's note: Roosevelt is my high school. All the characters in this play are my friends and peers. Granted, all names are changed, but the sentiment and the content is real. High schools - or at least mine - have a problem. I live my life praying for Harvard, bowing down to Dartmouth, and yearning for Yale, but I know that in the end I will just be disappointed -- a 3.0 in eighth grade math will do that to you.
The Magnifying Glass is, if nothing else, a cry for help. I hope the world is ready to listen.  « Hide author's note
Chapters:   « Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 ... 9 Next »

Scene Two: Everything Begins to Count

SCENE 2: EVERYTHING BEGINS TO COUNT

NARRATOR: Scene Two – Everything Begins to Count.

ORA STANLEY (walks into spotlight): When you’re a freshman, everything begins to count. The only problem with this is that the younger you are that you begin thinking about college, the worse. Kids start taking classes and doing things only because they’ve heard from other kids that a college may like that, or it may look good on the application, or because so-and-so did it an so-and-so goes to such-and-such school (moves over, ELLIE FIENMAN joins her in spotlight).

NARRATOR: Ellie Feinman is a school theater star.

ELLIE FIENMAN: Kids should think about grades all through high school, but they shouldn’t feel the need to stress about it until junior year. People feel that school and getting good grades is the most important thing and that doing badly is awful.

ORA STANLEY: Their pursuing of their own passions becomes less likely. It’s totally common to hear a lot of students talking about what to do with their life because it “looks good on college” or “prepares you well for college” and the robot aspects become clear again. We aren’t individuals anymore, but kids working against each other, doing the same things, so we can get into whatever prestigious university is hot at the moment.

ELLIE FEINMAN: Grades are important – but they are not everything.

ORA STANLEY: Except for… sometimes I wonder if that’s even still true.
Chapters:   « Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 ... 9 Next »


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