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Life is Too Short Not to Love

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It was a normal day. My mom picked me up after a fun day of everyone else taking finals while I watched movies and ate popcorn and listened to music in my classes where we had already taken the final. We were driving home, listening to soft rock on the radio. “What Doesn’t Kill You Makes You Stronger” by Kelly Clarkson was playing while we drove up the street, two left turns away from my house, when we heard the sirens. My mom pulled to the right, worry suddenly creasing her face. The ambulance sped past us, then stopped about 250 feet in front of us. We slowly drove up behind it. A police car whizzed past us, following the ambulance, then coming to a quick stop behind it. My mom and I, our vision blocked by the ambulance, looked at eachother, then silently got out of the car. A small crowd was already starting to form around the scene. We walked around the ambulance, then gasped.

A young man, probably in his early 20’s, had been struck by a black pickup truck. The man had been riding a motorcycle and the truck had been making an illegal U-turn. The man was bleeding from his head, even though he was wearing a helmet. The paramedics quickly took off his shirt, shoes, pants, and helmet and began to check for a pulse. Not finding one, they began chest compressions. After 10 minutes, there was still no pulse. The chorus of “What Doesn’t Kill You Makes You Stronger” was still playing in my head.

As I stood there, in the midday sun, surrounded by people I didn’t know, I began to feel a sense of community. These people around me, who felt the same emotions as me about this young boy, whom they probably didn’t know as well, were supporting each other. Crying children were being held by the closest adult there. An elderly man, anguish overtaking his face, was surrounded by a group of worried teens, protecting him from the gruesome sight of the young man laying on the floor, less than 15 feet away. At that point, I realized the true goodness in every person. In a time of crisis, people put aside their differences and come together to support each other. I had never realized that before.

I would just like to thank that nameless young man who lost his life almost a year ago, because he taught me a very important lesson. He taught me that there is good in every person, good that can come out at any given time, no matter what they look like, or how they talk, or where they come from. I am guilty of bullying people, making fun of others, and just being mean. That nameless man taught me that life is too short to not love everyone who comes into it, which is why I have decided to never be mean or cruel to anyone ever again. I believe that there is good in everyone and that to not love everyone is a loss on your part... This I Believe.



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CarlyKatherine said...
today at 7:33 pm:
That was beautiful...I had tears in my eyes. I don't know what else to say other than: wow. I am literally speachless.
 
Ashley4476 This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine. replied...
today at 11:27 pm :
Thank you so much! Your comment really means a lot to me.  
 
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