The Revolution of Sabine by Beth Levine Ain

July 4, 2012
By TheWritingArtist PLATINUM, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
TheWritingArtist PLATINUM, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
22 articles 1 photo 11 comments

The Revolution of Sabine is now one of my all-time favorite books! It’s a historical fiction book that includes juicy details that even girls today can relate to. It takes place in Paris, France in the 1700s while over in America they are fighting for their freedom in the Revolutionary War. Sabine Durand lives in a rich family of aristocrats where she doesn’t fit in. She hangs out with the help and is better friends with them than her own best friend. She realizes she wants freedom from her mother. Especially when Sabine is put into an arranged marriage with a man she dislikes and reads a story about a boy and girl finding each other and falling in love after years of running away from each other. So Sabine falls in love with her maid’s son - whom her mother disapproves of completely. Now she really doesn’t want to marry Jean-Philippe de Croy. Sabine also longs for her freedom when she meets Benjamin Franklin at a dinner party she wasn’t supposed to be at. This causes a pretty funny circumstance. At a different dinner party, her family joins the de Croy family to meet Benjamin Franklin. Sabine walks right up to him and apologizes for having to leave. Mr. Franklin says he hopes it’s somewhere of importance. Sabine replies with, “I think you’d approve.” The boy, Michael, who she has fallen in love with, was planning on leaving for America today, so Sabine was going to try and meet him and sail over to America. Instead, her dad met her outside of the dinner party. He mentioned how he has an aunt in Rheims, a small town in France. He claimed no one would ever catch her there. Will she ride to her aunt’s house and gain freedom in France, or will she follow her true love all the way to America?


The author's comments:
I recommend all girls read this story because it's a great coming-of-age story. It just takes place in the 1700s instead of 2012. It includes romance, drama, and historical elements. It's a phenomenal novel!

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