Her Words

November 20, 2011
By Anonymous

“Not worth it"
she says, of many attempts I make
dismissing goals to graduate
both high school and college.
My brother didn’t
my sister didn’t
so why would I?
My friends are left pouring hope
into spaces she left empty.
I pretend
her words are meaningless
when in reality
they tear me apart inside.
But the words that hurt most?
The ones she never says.
“I’m proud of you”
“Good job”
All the things I’m more than used to hearing from my dad
but never from her.
I guess I shouldn’t be surprised
we really only have two things in common.
Reading
cooking.
But last time I checked
you can’t read me your love
and you definitely can’t cook it.
But now when I see her
using that Forever Sharp knife
worth more to her than her own daughter’s education
I can’t help but think of another
made not of stainless steel
but of words both spoken and unpresent.
So thanks Mom
now I’m left removing it on my own
with hopes that someday
we’ll stand together in this kitchen
while you admit the regrets you have
over the words you said
and even more
the ones you never even bothered with.

The author's comments:
This poem was originally written as a slam poem, to be performed in front of my English class...rather than a written piece. However, I feel it's versatile enough to work as both. Opinions welcome, constructive critisism encouraged!

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This article has 2 comments.


on Jan. 5 2012 at 6:11 pm
xhiddeninsomniax SILVER, North Syracuse, New York
7 articles 2 photos 40 comments
The "unpresent" was intentional, referring to the things she never said, but should have.

IzzyVT SILVER said...
on Jan. 4 2012 at 4:24 pm
IzzyVT SILVER, N. Ferrisburg, Vermont
6 articles 0 photos 47 comments

Favorite Quote:
“If the person you are talking to doesn't appear to be listening, be patient. It may simply be that he has a small piece of fluff in his ear.”
― A.A. Milne, Winnie-the-Pooh

Definitely a powerful message being sent from the speaker to their mother...this is especially driven home when she addresses her directly. Towards the end of the poem, you say her words are "both spoken and unpresent"...are you meaning to say "unpleasant"? But, again, you did a wonderful job communicating such strong feelings.


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