Switching Views a Year Later

Promises are empty words until filled - “I promise this,” and “I promise that.” Since Barack Obama's message was filled with aspiring changes, voters believed him for a year with no results. The conventional Democratic Virginia and New Jersey voters dropped their old opinions and voted for Republican candidates. November fourth was an opportunity for Republicans to lift their voters' opinions. John Dickerson's “What a Difference a Year Makes” describes the tribulations between the Republican and Democratic parties, and the Liberals' current animosity towards the Republicans. One fact can be pulled from the voters' sway in candidates: Americans are tired of waiting and receiving what they don't desire.

A year ago, it was declared that the states were in an economic downfall, and Democrats wanted something different after being in a war in the middle-east. Obama promised to end the war, saying he'd 'change' the country, and foster people who couldn't take care of themselves. As legitimate or illegitimate as Obama's votes may have been (including ACORN, who has inundated Nevada's registrar office, submitting nearly 90,000 phony and duplicate applications (Larry Lomax, Clark Country, Nevada, told CNSNews.com)), he was voted into the presidential office. Once elected, he quickly imposed stimulus bills – even without the people's support – which placed America in billions of dollars in debt.

Soon enough, people began to realize that the 'change' Obama visioned only worsened the economy of their country. He didn't end the war in Iraq as promised; instead, he ignored the general of the forces in Afghanistan who has been requesting answers to important questions over the past three months. Regarding the healthcare bill, he's forcing high taxes on the unwilling working class to pay for a lesser quality of care, supporting a small population of people who presently don't have healthcare. This is unfair and wrong, as any individual can infer; a constitutional violation of attaching working-people's paychecks without consent.

Strangely enough, Obama's coalition is subsiding, mostly two groups of people: African-Americans, and voters aged 18 to 29. Why did only twenty five of the total seventy percent of his coalition vote in the November fourth governor elections? Was it doubt? Was it fear? What ever it could've been, this could be a leading factor in the unfinished healthcare debate. Trust is a major factor, deciding “if Democrats think that Obama can't help them – or at least protect them – in next year's election, they'll feel less compelled to vote with him. They won't take his promises to give them cover if they have to take a hard vote,” told by Dickerson.

When Bill Owens won in New York's 23rd district, he was the first of the Democratic party to succeed since the Civil War. After a false allegiance by Dede Scozzafava, Newt Gingrich argued “that by purging the party of candidates who didn't agree, it would guarantee Obama's re-election … because the pure conservative candidate wouldn't be able to win in more moderate districts.” This seems like a challenge the conservatives won't be able to turn away from. One mistake is all the democrats needed to begin a ripping rant.

Personally not agreeing with the actions being taken (and agreeing with Dickerson), feeling doubtful is a common disposition. The healthcare bill will hinder workers' futures, largely impacting medicinal wage-earners. Raising taxes will hinder the advantage of having a job and working for an individual's upkeep. Thirteen months ago, the people of America wanted change, but they did not realize what that would result in with their jobs, taxes, and structure of their government. Now that people have seen the true meaning of having a democratic government, the people of America aspiration to hear their voices heard, and recognize their country as a constitutional ally.





Post a Comment

Be the first to comment on this article!

bRealTime banner ad on the left side
Site Feedback