Cross-Country

November 1, 2007
By
To arrive at the school at nine o’clock of the cool morning in June, to run along the sidewalks, to cross over busy streets and make our paths, shoes tied tight, with the sound of cars, this is what the cross-country team practices for. Some call our group crazy. We agree.

The cross-country team conducts unofficial practices until the Monday before the first week of school. Our seniors control these practices, like a dictatorship. The summer practices contain never ending excitement because we just run and mess around while the team trots around.

During the beginning of the summer, our excursions can range in distances between two miles to five miles. Nearing the end of summer, we travel around five miles and eleven miles on long days. Making our total during a week fifteen to thirty-five miles.

Non-runners continuously try to convince me that cross-country befall the ranking of a sport because the athletes just sprint around a track for a long time. These non-runners need to first learn what cross-country even ensues. We do not rush on tracks; we scamper around fields or grassy paths. The definition of a sport transpires to “an athletic activity requiring skill or physical prowess and often of a competitive nature, as racing, etc.” (dictionary.com). This definition states that racing exists as a sport, therefore, cross-country subsists as a sport.

My involvement in cross-country became strong through my years on the team. I ran all four years. The team enjoys pasta the night before a race and then gets an exciting game of football going. Coach Locke tells us not to play. Cross-country equals an amazing experience. Cross-country and family can be considered synonyms for our team.





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