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The Long Life of Me, Paul Revire

On December 1737, I am born. My parents are Deborah Hitchborn Revere and my dad’s name is Apollos Rivoire. When I was 19, my father died and left me the family business. I felt a mixture of emotions. Some happy, and some sad. I was excited that I got a new responsibility of the family business, and sad that my dad died. But, since I was too young to work in the family business, I enrolled to fight the French in the Crown Point expedition. It was tough, but we won.



When tension developed in the mother country, after the Seven Years’ War, I emerged
as one of the leaders of the group of artisans who identified themselves with the critics of the policies of the mother country. As a Mason, I had already met James Otis. Joseph Warren, and other liberty fighters. I became part of the Sons of Liberty.


On March 5th, 1770, five men were shot to death by British in the city of Boston. From where I was, I could hear women screaming, guns firing, and when I poked my head out of my doorway, I saw the British soldiers firing into the mob. There were men and boys taunting a sentry standing guard at the city's customs house. I was horrified that British were firing into unarmed colonists. The men and boy’s were holding pitchforks, and shovels, as if they wanted to bash in the British heads. So I ran back inside with a feeling of dread. I went to check if my children were still sleeping. I didn’t want them to hear such a horrible thing. I saw them all awake, and cuddled up close to Sarah. she gave me a look of dispair, an I returned it with a glare. When other British soldiers came to the sentry's support, a free-for-all ensued and shots were fired into the crowd. Their shots killed five people, all colonists. I made color prints showing the Massacre. The colonists called it, the Bloody Massacre, but then later got its name, the Boston Massacre. When this was over, you could go into the place where it had been, look down, and you saw blood. It was dried blood, so it looked almost blackish. I was doing what any like-minded patriot with his talents in 1770 would have done. Only, I did it faster.


Around 11 o’clock, on April 16th 1775, I walked into Charlestown, and met with Colonel Conant and richard Devens, both from members of the Committee of Safety. It was a dark night, and cold as well. I had brought my jacket, but it was not nearly warm enough. I was still chilled to the bone, by the icy wind that was blowing across the town.
They had seen the signal lanterns I had set up, and had already sent a rider to Lexington. But I decided to go too, just in case the first person got caught or something. I borrowed a horse from my buddy, Deacon John Larkin, and set out under the cover of moonlight. I was not far passed the intersection of the Cambridge and Medford roads, when I spotted two Red Coats resting in the shade of a tree. I thought, how could they possibly be cold?!?! It’s like, I don’t know, 50 degrees outside?? Unfortunately, they both saw me and my friend’s horse. The first red coat attempted to cut across a field to try and cut me off, but got stuck in a pond. I laughed at him. The second officer gave up as soon as he realized that my horse was a lot faster than his. I eventually got to Lexington and Concord, and warned Sam Adams and John Hancock. It was still cold outside, so I was eager to return home. Sam invited me to stay over there, and I gladly took it.



But then, in 1813, my second wife Rachel died at the age of 68. I was devastated!! Yet, i followed shortly after, on May 10th 1818 at the age of 83. That was pretty old for that time. Most people died young at the age of like, 23. I had had a total of sixteen children with both of my wives. I am currently buried at the old Granary Burial Ground in Suffolk County in Boston Massachusetts. I helped fight the british and owned a quite successful copper mill. I hope you will all remember me, and what I did for my country. I hope I will live on forever in your memories.

Rough Draft 1


On December 1737, a Revolutionary hero is born. His name is Paul Revere. In 1754, his dad died, and left him the family business but since he was too young, he volunteered to fight the french in the Crown Point expedition. Then, in 1757, he married for the first time to Sarah Orne. The very next year, they had their first child, Deborah. Then, two years after, Paul Jr. was born to them. Inn 1773, Sarah died and Paul married Rachel Walker. The next year, Paul rode to New York and Pennsylvania telling of the Port Bill.


Around 11 o’clock on April 16th 1775, Revere walked into Charlestown and met with Colonel Conant and Richard Devens, members of the Committee of Safety. They had seen the signal lanterns and Devens had already sent a rider to Lexington. Revere borrowed a horse from Devens and set out under moonlight. One British officer attempted to cut a field in order to stop Revere, but got stuck in a pond. The second officer gave up as Revere’s horse outdistanced his own.



In 1787, Paul’s sixteenths child, John is born. Then, in 1788, He opens a foundry.
He opens the first copper mill in America in 1801. It was found on the corner of Lynn and Foster Street in Boston. After several years of producing iron products, He started
making bolts and spikes for the shipping industry. In 1800 at the age of 65, he purchased and renovated a former gunpowder mill in Canton , Mass for use as a copper mill. He became the first American to successfully roll copper into sheets.


Then, sadly, in 1813, his wife, Rachel Walker dies. He follows shortly after, in 1818. He was 83, which is a long time to live in that time. He had had sixteen children with both his wives.

Rough Draft 2


The Long Life of Paul Revere.
A memoir


On December 1737, A revolutionary war hero is born/. His name is Paul Revere. He was born to Deborah Hitchborn Revere. When he was only 19 years of age, his father died and left him the family business, but since he was too young, he volunteered to fight the French in the Crown Point expedition. Three years later, he married for the first time, Sarah Orne. The very next year, they had their first child. A girl named Deborah. Two year after, Their first boy was born. His name was Paul Jr. after his dad. In 1773, Sarah died And Paul got remarried. His new wife was named Rachel Walker. A year after he got married, he rode off to Pennsylvania, telling of the Port Bill.


Around 11 o’clock on April 16th, 1775, Revere walked into Charleston and met with Colonel Conant and Richard Devens, members of the Committee of Safety. They had seen the signal lanterns, and Devens had already sent a rider to Lexington. Revere borrowed a horse from Deacon John Larkin and set out under moonlight, He was not far past the intersection of the Cambridge and Medford roads, when he spotted two British officers in the shade of a tree. He turned and headed back to make for the Medford road. One British Officer Attempted to cut across a field in order to stop Revere, but got stuck in a pond. The second officer gave up as Revere’s horse outdistanced his own.


In 1787. Paul’s sixteenth child, John, was born. Then, in 1788, he opened a foundry. In 1800, at the age of 65, Revere purchased and renovated a former gunpowder mill in Canton, Mass for use as a copper mill. It was the first ever copper mill in America in 1801. It was founded on the corner of Lynn and Foster Street in Boston. After several year of producing iron products, he started making bolts and spikes for the shipping industry. He became the first American to successfully roll copper into sheets.


Then, sadly, in 1813, his second wife, Rachel Walker died at age of 68. He follows shortly after on May 10th, 1818 at age of 83, which is a long time to live at that time. He had a total of sixteen children with both his wives. He is currently buried at the old Granary Burial Ground, located in Suffolk County in Boston Massachusetts. He helped fight the British, and owned a quite successful copper mill in his long life. We will all remember Paul Revere, and what he did for our country. He was a very brave man, and will live on forever in our memories.




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