Nature's Forgotten Child This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine.


      He sat in my hands, helpless. He was a runt,nature's forgotten child. His brothers and sisters had lefthim to die, but he didn't care. I could only wonder, What isthe point? Most likely he will die anyway. I'm just goingagainst what nature wants by giving him a better chance tolive.

He was a freshly hatched turtle and ready to go.So small and innocent, yet nature would badger him to hisgrave. But life is not fair and this baby had to pay theprice. I set him down before the surf, with the great unknownahead of him. He cared not for me, but for his instinct. Hewas swimming away as fast as his flippers could move. Ithought of leaving and returning to my normal life, butdecided to stay. It was good I did! Not long after hedisappeared from view, he came flying back on the next wave. Icould tell he was frustrated; I certainly would be. He madehaste to be back in the watery haven, but could not win hisfight. Wave after wave brought the little swimmer back to myfeet. I could not allow him to use all his energy on thissimple task. I lifted him up from the sands; it is so amazingthat such a pebble in nature could someday be a master of theseas. I made my way out to where the cold Atlantic watersreached my waist; he would have to begin his journey fromthere. I let him into the water. He didn't remain on thesurface for a second; he was off swimming.

I wonderwhere he is. Perhaps he is in the stomach of a crab, which isinside a man. Perhaps he is swimming, diving and swirling aspart of a masterful ballet of the sea. It is funny how natureworks. That little turtle I once held proved it to me.




This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine. This piece has been published in Teen Ink’s monthly print magazine.






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