Murder In The Queens

Thirty eight respectable, law-abiding citizens in Queens watched a killer stalk and stab a woman in three separate attacks in Kew Gardens. The lurid fact that the killer came back to stab the woman on three separate occasions in terrible. Not one person telephoned the police during the attack. Even with the time the killer let elapse, before coming back to stab the lady, not one single person of the thirty eight individuals called the police.
To obviate the murder, I would have called the police after the first stabbing. All people of Queens seemed lax during the murder, and didn’t take any action. A murder is sporadic, and when it happens, it is a big deal. The lady did not have to die that day. One person should have taken the effort to phone the police.
The murderer in this article was not rash about killing the lady, which gave the people of Queens time to call the police. Thirty minutes elapsed while the citizens sat in their domiciles. Not one phone call was made…The woman was stabbed again and died. This murderer was not quip, it seemed like he had no plan to kill her. Still the murderer got away.
The real problem was making a conjecture to capture the murderer. Chief Inspector Frederick M. Lussen was confused that the “good people” failed to call the police. It wasn’t until the ambulance came until the people came out about the murder. It was the meticulous work of the detective that brought the killer to justice, not the good people of Queens.
It is too bad the lady had to die in this story. Why the people did not call the police is unheard of. If one person called the police before the killer came back to stab her again, she would have lived. I learned that calling the police can save a life. This is a good example of a true story that puzzles me. I am glad I read it.





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