big view small world

By , Elk Grove, CA
I stared down that lonesome road as I prepared to scratch this irritable urge to defeat my arrogant opponent. It was a clear summer afternoon and the sun reflected off that newly paved road creating a mesmerizing mirage. I can taste that salty sweat running down my cheeks. The goal was to get to the other side of the street first. The prize was just the satisfaction of making it to the other side first, and ludicrously taking in that breeze onto my perspired body. “Ready, get mark, get set, GO!” I pedaled as fast as I could, with only one intention in mind, reaching the end of the race. Halfway through the unofficial track I suddenly flipped over my decrepit mountain bike. I remember seeing my swift opponent pass by me that second I fell down. I blacked out and was unconscious, unable to tell the difference between my conscience and reality. For some odd reason I was trying to figure out whether it was Wednesday or Tuesday. I didn’t even realize that I had fallen off my bike until I heard of voice calling my name. Incapable of interpreting what had happen, I was luckily lucid enough to walk home alive. Until this day I learned how to live my life circumspectly and taking careful steps onto the ladder of success. Therefore, to finish this race some slips and fall must be overcome in order to become triumphant.

As a result, I pulled myself together from that unexpected fall, despite the excruciating pain, that a little dirt can always be washed off. I then began the baby steps to defining myself by learning from past mistakes. Consequently, I still make the same mistakes, but it only motivated me to climb even faster with more stability. My resilience grew from this point of my life. Indeed the smartest idea for now might be to remain exactly where I am. Instead I will stubbornly take the big step on the ladder and know what is out there for me.
Stepping onto the ladder to success changed my perspective of life. As I climbed higher my view of the world expanded with my imagination. It opened unique opportunities and interests for me to explore. My thirst for knowledge was incomparable to the person beside me, because everyone has a ladder of their own; they have their own view of the world. As I grew from my mistakes, I learned to embrace my imperfection and my tenacious being. This ladder not only shapes my judgment of the person next to me, but also gave me the chance to becoming a better son, friend, and student.
So when I received my brand new bike, I took the chance to race my opponent again. Unfortunately he defeated me again in my own race. I may have lost but failure is as powerful as being at the top of that climb to success.





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