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Deus Ex: Human ­Revolution This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine.


The third game in the first-person-shooter/role-playing series “Deus Ex: Human Revolution” is an instant classic. This prequel to the original game is a nonstop adrenaline rush that combines the artistic style and dialogue of the “Mass Effect” series with the stealth gameplay of “Metal Gear Solid 4.”

In the year 2027, human augmentation technology allows people with enough money to improve their body cybernetically to make them stronger, smarter, or more responsive. The world is split into two groups: pro- and anti-augmentation. Sarif Industries' headquarters is attacked by Purity First, a radical anti-augmentation group. At the end of the first level, during the cut scene, Sarif Industries' security chief, Adam Jensen, is thrown through a window into a panel of electronics, then shot by a mercenary who also kidnaps and kills the lead researcher, who is Adam's love interest. Adam is involuntarily augmented, making him faster and deadlier. After six months, he returns to his job, and you are thrown into the intriguing plot of the game.

Augmentations are a major part of the game play. Every time you level up, you get points that let you unlock new augmentations. Upgrades include strength, energy, and speed. The game rewards you for creativity and finding hidden paths by giving extra loot, points, and money.

The game provides beautiful lighting and effects, and the models and textures are very up-to-date, with graphics rivaling popular games like “Call of Duty: Black Ops” and “Halo: Reach.” The first-person animations are very well done, but the third-person animations tend to be clunky and slow. The nighttime backdrop of Detroit provides breathtaking views of skyscrapers in the moonlit haze.

Another plus is the soundtrack; it's one of the best I've heard on a video game. The beautiful melodies fit into the game very well. The gun sound effects sound rich and realistic. The voice acting is decent but can sometimes be off-sync with the animations.

Overall, the game deserves a playthrough for its beautiful graphics and presentation. It's rated “M” for mature.

This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine. This piece has been published in Teen Ink’s monthly print magazine.





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