Casablanca

April 29, 2015
By --Em-- GOLD, Grand Rapids, Michigan
--Em-- GOLD, Grand Rapids, Michigan
15 articles 0 photos 32 comments

I have observed that most teenagers these days veer away from films that don’t involve vampires or have actors who are at least one of the three S’s (shallow, stupid and sexy). Well I am writing today to prove that the classics are still appreciated. I hope that all you teens out there are reading this, because I am about to introduce you to the greatest movie of all time…(pause for effect)... Casablanca. 


I have a feeling that a few of you just sighed in annoyance that I chose such an old movie, but just wait and hear me through. Casablanca has just the right blend of shooting, kissing, drinking, drama and beautiful romance to wow any viewer, whether you’re old and gray or young and pierced.


Casablanca was produced in 1942, so it was made in the glorious age of black and white movies. I personally love movies without color, it allows you to imagine just a bit about the characters. Rick Blaine (played by the amazing Humphrey Bogart) owns a cafe in the town of Casablanca, Morocco in December of 1941. For the benefit of everyone who slept through history class, this is during World War II. Nazis occupy the area and a large amount of refugees are stuck in this African city. Many are attempting, without much success, to gain ownership of the letters of transit that will allow them to get to America. At the beginning of the movie, you will see a man getting shot down just for carrying these letters; this short scene emphasizes just how desperate people were to obtain these important papers.


One supporting actor that I feel needs to be briefly recognized is Ingrid Bergman. Bergman plays the part of Ilsa, Rick’s former lover who comes to his cafe with her husband, trying to get letters of transit.  Following this comes a few romantic scenes and a flashback when Rick gets drunk after seeing Ilsa for the first time since she left him.
Don’t worry, I won’t bore you any longer. Now you have two choices; you can either go back to texting or eating or whatever trivial thing you were doing before you started reading this, or you can immerse yourself in this incredible work of art. So long as you have a heart and soul, you will not regret watching Casablanca.


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This article has 3 comments.


Beila BRONZE said...
on May. 7 2015 at 12:59 pm
Beila BRONZE, Palo Alto, California
3 articles 0 photos 519 comments

Favorite Quote:
"The coldest winter I ever spent was a summer in San Francisco." -Mark Twain

And I'm glad that you were able to appreciate the constructive criticism! If you have a chance, please do return the favor. :)

--Em-- GOLD said...
on May. 7 2015 at 7:46 am
--Em-- GOLD, Grand Rapids, Michigan
15 articles 0 photos 32 comments
Thanks for the suggestions! I am glad that you criticized me rather than just told me it was "good" .

Beila BRONZE said...
on May. 7 2015 at 3:17 am
Beila BRONZE, Palo Alto, California
3 articles 0 photos 519 comments

Favorite Quote:
"The coldest winter I ever spent was a summer in San Francisco." -Mark Twain

Congratulations, your review made me both smile and want to watch the movie. :) As far as I can review a review ;), I'll say that it took too long to get to the good stuff, and you weren't assertive enough about the superiority of the movie. Sure, I love your "young and pierced" jab, and the "pause for effect" is merely one of the several instances where you inject your own voice, which is awesome... BUT! There is never any need to write "I have observed that" or "Well I am writing today to prove that" or "I hope that all you teens out there are reading this, because." Obviously, you're writing, and it's based on your observations, and you have a purpose in sharing them, and therefore, you hope someone will read them. None of the "I" statements add anything new. To make your review stronger, you could simply make the declarations you preface by emphasizing your opinion as if they were factual, reducing the questionable reliability of one person's opinion and quickening the pace of the read. Try reading through the first paragraph without the above phrases; I think you'll see what I mean. :) In further places, cut the "I feel" and "I personally love." This review is your chance to force your opinion on us, so don't excuse it as personal--make it ours, too! :P That said, the review works for me, and I loved everywhere you added your original voice! Keep doing that, and thanks for a great review of what promises to be a great movie!




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