Pump Up The Volume This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine.

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   "Pump up the Volume" has been labelled a "controversial" film for one reason. It defies the stereotype of movies about teenagers. Adults are displayed as the authority figures that they really are, with a truth of character rarely seen. Some say it is a parody on adults, but I believe it's just a true perspective on the behavior patterns of some often less-than-holy adults in our society including school administrators, political figures, and, of course, parents. "Pump" represents teenagers as people, real human beings with strong minds and emotions, not as the rebellious, sex-craved, drug-using, junk-food eating hoodlums we normally see in movies.

This may be a slightly exaggerated stereotype, but "Pump" is the first movie in a long time that really woke me up and made me say "Yeah! This film relates to me!" The movie was refreshing because it was a complete reversal of the typical point of view. I felt as if the movie were written, directed, and filmed by my friends.

"Pump Up the Volume" was nothing like the movies that show teenage dating, eating, and social habits in a "documentary" style like something you'd see in the TV Guide next to "The Rock Music is Satanic Special" or "The Study of the Homo Sapien Suburban Teenager Beast." But seriously, folks, it was a great movie, and the Summer of A90 with all its controversy and censorship was the perfect time for "Pump Up the Volume" to climb up out of the muck and turn on a simple light that has always been there. An added bonus for alternative music fans is the soundtrack, including cuts from the Pixies, Soundgarden, Sonic Youth, and others.n




This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine. This piece has been published in Teen Ink’s monthly print magazine.






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