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The Last King of Scotland This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine.

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     “The Last King of Scotland” takes us back to the early 1970s when Idi Amin (Forest Whitaker) seizes power in a military coup and becomes president of Uganda.

Directed by Kevin Macdonald and based on Giles Foden’s novel, the movie introduces us to Scottish physician Nicholas Garrigan (James McAvoy), a

recent medical-school graduate who selects a clinic in a Ugandan village to practice medicine. While Amin is traveling in a convoy through one of the neighboring villages, he is involved in an automobile accident. Dr. Garrigan is summoned to help, and this chance encounter lands Dr. Garrigan the position of Amin’s personal physician, top advisor and confidant.

Those unfamiliar with Idi Amin and his rule may grow to admire his humor, charm and power. You may get swept away by how he is portrayed early in the movie as a president who cares about his country, his people and the future development of Uganda. It is evident that Dr. Garrigan is bedazzled, but all good things come to an end and the doctor falls out of grace. Soon after, he begins to witness Amin’s mood swings, paranoia and the carnage he inflicts on Ugandans.

This movie uniquely depicts dictatorship. It will primarily appeal to an older audience (or one aware of the ongoing conflicts in Africa). This movie has some graphic scenes of dismembered bodies and executions.

As a whole, “The Last King of Scotland” is an interesting interpretation of the Ugandan genocide that should help everyone develop a greater awareness of what is happening in the world.

This movie is rated R.

This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine. This piece has been published in Teen Ink’s monthly print magazine.





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AlexandriaRose said...
today at 8:09 pm:
I love this review and I love this movie.
 
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