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Horton Hears a Who

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For those who feared Dr. Seuss’ voice will be lost in the adaptation of Horton Hears A Who, fear no more, because it’s got Seuss written and drawn all over it. The morals, the images and even the sound, Dr. Seuss can be heard not only by Horton in the movie all around.

Dr. Seuss’s interpretation of Democracy and display of its invalidities is incredibly on the spot, no matter what century you’re in. This includes the old lessons of why Germany was taken over by Hitler’s views and how to avoid it, as well as the newer nihilistic ideas that human’s are much too insignificantly small to make any big difference in the world. Seuss offers a much uplifting idea that everyone can make a difference because "a person is a person, no matter how small." These morals are so flawlessly and brightly adapted by Ken Daurio and Cinco Paul that I wish these guys wrote history textbooks.

More Seussian-time influences include a Russian hit man bird that the cold-war-era Kangaroo leader hires. Such characters remind you very much of the political cartoons Seuss used to draw back in the 50’s.

The incredible capability of Seuss to continuously deliver through the ages can be both depressing and uplifting. Happy, because it displays that only the good writing can withstand the torture of time and still be relevant. However, it is sad because we all know that Seuss wrote about the shorts of human-kind and politics face, and if these nuances are still relevant and laughed at today, then, sadly we cannot really say we have came far as a democratic world/society. But hey, what have children’s movies been there for but to show the worst of man kind in such a nice way that could make you laugh?
This movie derves a DVD buy as well as about 4 & 1/2 stars. Good job Carrel and Carrey.





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