The Dark Knight Rises This work is considered exceptional by our editorial staff.

August 15, 2012
Custom User Avatar
More by this author
I won’t pretend to know Christopher Nolan’s methods, or how he writes his screenplays, and I wont pretend I could do better. Because I don’t really believe anyone could. This is, to me, the perfect movie. It is my all time favorite, and here’s why:
I had high expectations about this movie since 2009, which was around when I saw “The Dark Knight” for the first time. I didn’t really appreciate TDK until after my mind had been scrambled by another one of Nolan’s pieces- “Inception”. From then on my outlook on movies (and the universe in general) was altered drastically. To be perfectly honest I didn’t know a movie could do so much or have so much to say, and I think the only other time I’ve felt like that is when I saw Disney’s “The Lion King” when I was a really little kid. I ended up seeing the Dark Knight again and was so amazed by Heath Ledger’s performance (that I must have missed the first time- in my book the Joker is the best villain EVER). It opened my eyes to a dark kind of story to which I was previously unaware.
A giant thing about this movie is the camerawork- Giant, sweeping shots of a city or an arial view of a plane decomposing, there is an art here, and it is very noticeable, especially in iMAX. It is incorporated in every scene and woven into every detain. When the movie is over, you will want to explore more of the Bat-Cave, take a tour of the incredibly realistic Gotham.
The other, equally as fantastic portion of it was Hans Zimmer’s brilliant score. For this movie, and every other one he collaborated with Nolan on, he crafted the perfect, mood setting music. Whether it matched the femme fatale’s (Hathaway) feline, [sexy] sneakiness or the thundering unstoppable, Bane (Hardy), it left just as much of an impression as the visuals.
The Dark Knight Rises was very different from it’s predecessor but equally as potent. The Dark Knight was based on one villain and a series of creative crimes. That, perhaps, is what made it so unconventional and popular. The third leg of the trilogy began in a similar fashion. With a KILLER opening sequence, instead of sweeping views of a city, the introduction of the villain and a spectacular plane crash took the stage, What is so surreal about that sequence is that it actually happened, they really tore apart a plane during filming. If you think of that while watching the movie, it takes it to an entirely different level.

The second half of the movie continues with one major event in Gotham. It is very cool to watch- each of the characters is off doing their own thing- in a pit, or jail- but everyone comes back, everyone contributes to the final showdown. And there’s a twist in there to-
Be forewarned, this movie is wholly more enjoyable if you are familiar with the first two, There is a reference to one of them every couple scenes so keep your eyes peeled.
There is an all star cast here too. It proves my theory that Christopher Nolan uses the same actors over and over- but it works, because there veterans, and you know them, and you Like them. Michael Caine does an Oscar deserving performance as Alfred Pennyworth, Anne Hathaway is just... perfect, Christian Bale can be kind of dry at times, but he takes the Batman role to the heights it deserves, Morgan Freeman is still good, as always, and lastly, remember Mal? Yeah, she’s back! Marion Cotillard plays a wonderful Miranda Tate.
This is my all time favorite movie. Every second of it is outstanding, I need to see this movie 5 more times and buy a six disc blu-ray and I still won’t be satisfied. Seriously. I needed these past 10 paragraphs to rant (because apparently that annoys people in the real world) and I’m only half out of praise. See it. See it. See it. It lives up to the hype set by the dark knight.
But it does more- it Rises.





Post a Comment

Be the first to comment on this article!

bRealTime banner ad on the left side
Site Feedback