The Princess and the Frog This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine.

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Who doesn't enjoy a good princess movie? Lying on the couch with a little sister, snacking on popcorn and cans of lemonade, reminiscing about when you dreamed of your own prince charming … classic. Some of these princess movies are even classics themselves; they've been loved for as long as anyone can remember. Some princesses are forgettable, while others you see at Halloween every year.

One new princess may be on her way to becoming a Halloween favorite. For many, her story outshines all the rest. After over 70 years of princess movies, Disney has finally found near‑perfection in “The Princess and the Frog.”

In this movie, while the characters journey through New Orleans, they belt out songs telling their story. What did you expect? This is a princess movie;‑it's required to have a few catchy tunes. But musicals are turn‑offs for many; songs seem to only completely drown out the plots and personalities of countless movies, until all you are left with is enough jingles stuck in your head to make you go insane.

“The Princess and the Frog” is refreshingly different. In this two hour movie, only nine songs are sung and they all complement the movie well – no more random singing about being late for a date or about working in coal mines. Each song in “The Princess and the Frog” gives insight into the characters or the plot. You could run out during the movie for an emergency bathroom break, come back during a song, and not miss a beat.

The story itself is easy to follow. While the original Princess and the Frog tale is slightly twisted in this 1920s, Jazz Age version, Disney's new variation is imaginative and exciting. Once Princess Tiana (Anika Noni Rose) kisses the frog, you expect a prince to appear and an immediate happily ever after, right? Honey, get ready for a shock. Tiana is the one transformed – into a frog, no less! A situation like that wouldn't show up in your average princess fairy tale, but the overall feel of the movie is foreshadowed as the music and dialogue gently lead the audience through a story of enchanting surprises. There's never a dull, or confusing, moment.

Though it'd be punishable by law to have a princess movie without magic, these characters portray realistic human traits. Tiana, a hard-working businesswoman, shows her young viewers that determination to make dreams come true pays off. Prince Naveen (Bruno Campos), with his frivolous ­expenses and love of the “high‑life,” only ends up getting in trouble – a hard lesson to learn on your own in the real world. Even Louis (Michael Leon‑Wooley), a trumpet-playing alligator, proves that no matter who you are or what you look like, nothing can hold you back from doing what you want to do.

Sure, Sleeping Beauty has her perks: she gets to wake up after all the fighting to a handsome stud kissing her. But is that how life is? “The Princess and the Frog” has characters with realistic values and problems ending happily, which makes this movie that much more lovable.

With magic, evil, and a happy ending, “The Princess and the Frog” has everything a Disney princess movie should. And thankfully, it has a bit more too. With songs worth singing, a story worth praising, and values worth knowing, “The Princess and the Frog” is a true Disney classic.

This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine. This piece has been published in Teen Ink’s monthly print magazine.






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This article has 2 comments. Post your own now!

Beautifuleyes14 said...
Feb. 18, 2011 at 6:01 pm
Great review! And i agree! This movie does have great characterization for the main leads! I love princess movies and loved your review :)
 
BeccaLynn said...
Feb. 3, 2011 at 3:43 pm

Ha Ha ! I loved your review it mannaged to portray the amount of live humor the the movie has. Bravo!

I as a Disney fanatic find it refreshing of another non child that loves disney princess's. :)

 
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