Tease by Amanda Maciel

May 8, 2014
By WriterWannaBe PLATINUM, Somers Point, New Jersey
WriterWannaBe PLATINUM, Somers Point, New Jersey
23 articles 0 photos 28 comments

Due to the overwhelming amount of bullying that has gone on over the past few years, numerous novels have been published in hopes of enlightening new and future generations about the repercussions of harassment. Nearly all of these novels have been written from the point of view of victim. But Amanda Maciel’s Tease takes this old concept and gives it a twist: writing from the perspective of the bully.

Emma Putnam killed herself and according to everyone in town and online, it is Sarah Wharton’s fault. Sarah, her best friend Brielle, and three other classmates have been criminally charged for the bullying and harassment that led to Emma’s death. Instead of enjoying the summer before her senior year, Sarah is meeting with lawyers and a court-recommended therapist, shuffling her little brothers around town, and attending summer school. She is convinced that she did nothing wrong and that Emma deserved all of the harassment. After all, Emma is the one who stole Sarah’s boyfriend and along with the hearts of just about every other guy in school all within a few months of moving into town.

Emma definitely deserved everything that came to her. It wasn’t Sarah’s fault that Emma ended her own life, right? Forced by law to stay away from Brielle and the rest of the students on trial, Sarah spends much of her time alone, reading the articles written online about Emma’s death. She is forced to rethink everything that took place last year and to reevaluate whether or not she was a victim of Emma’s actions or the cause.

Maciel writes an interesting and captivating story that will leave readers thinking. However, readers will be thinking less of story and more of the characters involved. Although a little realistic, the dialogue in Tease is often stereotypical. Readers will also find that they unfortunately have no attachment to the characters. This is especially true for main character Sarah, whose wishy-washy personality isn’t agreeable with the human heart.

Overall, Tease is a satisfactory and relatively quick read. It also proves to be a good debut for Maciel. Fans of Young Adult Realistic Fiction will enjoy the novel and book clubs will find the plot and characters worthy of lengthy discussion.


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