Rebel Angels

April 2, 2009
By monica GOLD, New City, New York
monica GOLD, New City, New York
11 articles 0 photos 0 comments

As the sequel to A Great and Terrible Beauty by Libba Bray, Rebel Angels had the utmost potential to continue with the brilliant storyline that is Gemma Doyle's life, and Bray did not disappoint. Don't let the stuffy stereotype of a Victorian novel dismay you. This novel is full of adventure and wonderful magic that can either make or break one's life. It is compelling; it is grand.
Initially, the first book of the trilogy seemed a little faster paced, but by slowing down the plot within the small time frame of Christmas holiday break from Spence Academy, the reader got a true sense of what was going through Gemma's mind. Bray did not cease to amaze us with her mysteries. Every page makes you want to read more. Will Kartik obey the Rakshana? Will power consume Gemma, Felicity, and Ann? What happened to Pippa after she died? Who is the mysterious teacher, Miss McCleethy and what is her connection to Gemma's magic? Who is the real villain? What does Miss Moore have to do with the Realms of magic? So many more, and yet never too much. While reading this novel, the Victorian restrictions for women become more apparent. What a father did with his child. Gemma being courted by Simon, a well-off boy with an infatuation with Gemma. Gemma's lust for what she cannot have; Kartik. The end makes you thirst for the final novel.
If you are looking for a thrill, if you are looking for an edge of fear, pick up Rebel Angels, but only if you have read A Great and Terrible Beauty. If not, pick them both up today!


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on Mar. 1 2010 at 7:39 pm
literaryaddict PLATINUM, Albuquerque, New Mexico
23 articles 3 photos 157 comments

Favorite Quote:
"We're almost there and no where near it. All that matters is that we're going." Lorelai Gilmore, Gilmore Girls
"The whole theory of modern education is radically unsound." Lady Bracknell, The Importance of Being Earnest, Oscar Wilde

really really good review, but a couple of slight spoilers for those who have read a great and terrible beauty


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