Freakonomics by Stephen J. Dunbar and Steven D. Levitt

February 6, 2009
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In the unconventional novel, Freakonomics, Stephen J. Dunbar and Steven D. Levitt explore the freaky economic comparisons that most would consider appalling. The authors deliver a straightforward look at patterns in the economy and ways two completely opposite ideas are possibly related.
The book breaks down into several different parts, each addressing a topic. In one section, Levitt and Dunbar try to address the falling crime rate by relating the Supreme Court decision in Roe v. Wade. They continue to discuss the effect names have on children'or rather what children's names reveal about their socioeconomic background.
Freakonomics makes economics easy'explaining theories simply and plainly. If you enjoy linking the puzzle pieces of the economy, and figuring out why things happen, this book will do those odd questions justice. You will find yourself sharing things with your friends, like how their name may correlate to the number of years their mothers were educated.
Overall, Freakonomics is compelling and interesting, and will keep you guessing just why drug dealers live with their mothers. There is no time to become bored while reading this non-fiction novel.





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