The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger

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The novel, The Catcher in the Rye, tells the story of a teenage boy who just was kicked out of Prep School. At the beginning of the book, it is made clear that he is in some sort of institution. Holden's story is about his expulsion from prep school and it showcases the relationships in his life. He feels alienated and repeatedly tries to find closer relationships in the bars he frequents, in the girls he's dated, or the few adults in which he confides. Every encounter in New York leaves Holden lonelier than before. The Catcher in the Rye is the story of transition from childhood into adulthood. Holden is a very unreliable narrator. He even tells his audience that he is “the most terrific liar you ever met in your life.” He makes fun of everyone and everything and has a very negative outlook on life. His thoughts seem to be scattered as if he is unsure of what he wants. Holden tries to make his audience feel sorry for him but in the end, he realizes that nobody really cares.
Although I didn't care for the novel that much because Holden whined and complained a lot, there were a few parts of the story that I found very interesting and admirable. For example, when Holden is walking through the park and his little sister's school and notices the “f” word all over the place, he tries to erase them. Trying to protect his younger sister as well as the other children from having to see it only to realize that he can't protect them from it at all. The other portion of the story I really like is when Holden is walking down the street in the city and every time he steps to the end of the curb he feels as if he is going to fall and be lost forever. It shows that everyone is vulnerable at times and everyone is scared of something. Whether its children seeing bad language written everywhere or being forgotten.





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