The Mozart Effect by Dan Campbell This work is considered exceptional by our editorial staff.

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The Mozart Effect by Don Campbell effectively explains the astonishing changes that can be wrought upon a human body found listening to certain musical pieces as well as pointing out the harmful, healing and bizarre effects of certain tones and notes.
Campbell gives examples and reports on experimentation with the mind and body using different technologies in amazing detail and logic to make clearer the ideas that have been used to improve focus and cure certain infirmities. Slipping in his own stories, he describes other methods that he himself used to improve in almost every aspect of focus and knowledge. Using autistic children and their parents he proves that music is an improbable but reliable resource of healing for the afflicted.
The structure of The Mozart Effect was Campbell telling about his own miraculous experience using his inner mind to heal his physical mind. Then in an overview comparing someone Else's experiences and experimentation's, he describes the differences. Throughout the book he includes pages upon pages of accounts that loved ones relayed to him about the healing of individuals from infirmities.
At the end of The Mozart Effect one could enjoy more success stories and eve do a bit more research with all the resources included. I was very interested to hear about how our bodies have unused abilities to heal themselves. It is fascinating how we can will our own body into action without having to pay any overpriced hospital bills. I especially appreciated reading The Mozart Effect because it seemed to open a whole new world of possibilities and definitely sparked my creativity, imagination, and curiosity as to how far the concept pf using music to heal our minds and bodies could go.
In The Mozart Effect I failed to find a fallacy but I did find an intriguing story. It was about an autistic boy that was unnaturally disconnected from his mother, so they took him to a psychologist. The psychologist recorded his mother's voice and took out some of the lower frequencies, which cause anxiety. The leftover sound imitates what we as babies would hear in the womb. After the autistic boy listened to about 40 minutes of this recording, he grew calmer, let his mother hug him, and hold his hand as they left. Thus proving the legitimacy of the Mozart effect





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