Persuasion by Jane Austen This work is considered exceptional by our editorial staff.

March 11, 2011
In Jane Austen’s novel, Persuasion, Anne Elliot, the main character, struggles to conceal her previous distasteful engagement to the object of her affections and love, Captain Wentworth. The engagement was severed eight years prior to their encounter in Uppercross by significant influences on a young Anne. Thus, when they were finally reacquainted, Captain Wentworth’s resentment and pride kept him far from Anne’s conversations, and Anne’s humble sorrow prompts her to avoid Captain Wentworth at all costs. Eventually, after much prolonged suffering, both confront each other in hopes of straightening out any misunderstandings.

Personally, my favorite character in the story was Mrs. Smith. Although she was not introduced until near the end of the book, her cheerful façade – despite her gloomy situation – is a welcomed contrast to Anne’s distressed mood. Dismally, the book ultimately reveals that even she’s had her share of misfortune. Even though Mr. Elliot leaves her in the ruin, she still manages to keep an optimistic look at life, and she never loses hope of obtaining better accommodations.

I did like this book because Anne managed to take it all in stride. She remained earnest, compassionate, and observant. My favorite part in the book was when Anne conversed with Captain Wentworth because for a moment, everything seemed at ease. My least favorite part of the story was at any time that Elizabeth sided with Mrs. Clay, instead of Anne. If I were to alter the ending, I would only adjust Elizabeth’s final relationship status; I would give her someone to be happy with for the rest of her days.

I would highly recommend this story to anyone looking for a well spun out love story with a satisfying ending.





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