Frostbite by Richelle Mead

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Rebellious, vain, short tempered, and irritable 17 year old Rose Hathaway is having a few struggles on her way to becoming a guardian and fulfilling her absent mother’s dearest hopes. Having to endure a full day of training everyday at vampire academy, a high end school for vampires training to be morior, royal vampire, protectors, but she also is battling her feelings towards her best friend, Mason, and her trainer/ex-lover Demetri. Things already look complicated enough for Rose until her world begins to crumble at the death of a morior family and flustered Rose has to piece together all the scattered and missing information before another royal family is targeted for elimination.
Richelle Mead does an amazing job of expressing how important your relationships with others are and how in a flash your life may come smashing down because of an old enemy, or best friend. For example, the main character, Rose’s best friend and her share a remarkable friendship, but when thoughts that shouldn’t have been heard are discovered, the reader begins to question how deep their friendship really goes. For mason, even at the peak of danger and barely a chance of escaping with his life he still has to say to rose,” I hope…I hope when this is all done, we can sit down and talk and figure things out. I shouldn’t have gotten mad at you.”(294). Another thing the author did exceedingly well at was adding a surprising twist or cliffhanger at the end of each chapter to enthrall the reader to read more.
This book bears a remarkable resemblance to the House of Night series. Both books were very intriguing and written very well, however, any reader under the age of 15 to 16 should not read Frostbite for mature content. The overall impression still will make an impact and will stay with the reader for years to come.





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