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The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger

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The book is a classic and

commonly read in high schools around the United States. It’s a story of teen angst, confusion, rebellion, and controversy. Holden Caulfield is suddenly thrust into a world where he doesn’t want to be. In his mind he is surrounded by phonies in a world where no one understands. After being thrown out of two boarding schools for having poor grades, Holden found himself in his home town; New York City, three days before his Christmas break. Since he had decided not to inform his high-class parents of his expulsion, he decided to make it on his own. Over these three days he rarely ate, rarely slept, and goes through a whole life-evaluation. He was on the cusp of death, and deep inside his own insanity.
This book symbolizes loss of innocence. Holden talks about how he wants to grow up and be a “catcher in the rye,” someone who stands at the bottom of the cliff and catches the things or people who fall over the cliff. Holden wants to catch the children that fall off the cliff into corruption. Holden also becomes obsessed with the ducks in central park. He worries who takes care of them in the winter. They are so helpless in the cold to him. This also represents loss of innoncence.
I enjoyed this book very much. It seemed like a bunch of random rambling words, but in reality they pulled me into a confused, complicated, and misunderstood young man’s world. I can’t decide if I hate or love Holden, and I can’t predict a single word he says. Though unpredictable, he is still relatable. I began to wish that I had the guts to say the things he says, and feel the way he does. I always wanted to know what happened next and who or what Holden was going to experience next. It is a true emotional roller-coaster on paper.





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