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Frankenstein by Mary Shelley

The book Frankenstein by Mary Shelley threw me. Literally. In my advance in reading classic literature, this one was the first. I devoured it, even though the beginning nearly bored me to tears.

In the book Dr. Frankenstein is a man who, by many family tragedies, moves to a university town to study chemistry. He leaves his darling cousin Elizabeth (Who is also set up to be his wife) and his father and two brothers behind and goes to find new opportunities.

Once there, he realizes all that he had studied at home was outdated. He had been studying witchcraft and ghosts underneath natural sciences, and most studies were on the substance of life. Immediately he switched to study that field, and that's when his problems started.

While testing on worms and other small creatures, he determined how to put life into a form. In the book, he does not share how it is done, but he spends months gathering and creating what is supposed to be "The Ideal Body". On one stormy night, he brings his creation to life. He takes one look at the monster and flees, terrified of what he has done.

After a few frightening encounters, and horrifying deeds performed by the monster, Frankenstein complies to listen to its story. The monster tells him how he has been shunned by human company, and is so alone that he has been seeking out Dr. Frankenstein by murdering others. The creation asks Dr. Frankenstein to build him a partner, somebody he can love and who will be as terrifying as him. If he gets the partner, he says he will leave humankind alone.

Dr. Frankenstein, after arguing, says he will. He moves away to a remote island and begins working, knowing that the monster followed him there. One night, on the eve of finishing the creation, the monster peers into the window and grins. In a rage, Dr. Frankenstein tears his creation up, and throws his materials into the ocean.

The duo go on a cat and mouse run through the Arctic. The monster leaves clues for Frankenstein, and Frankenstein follows. Eventually Frankenstein finds himself on a ship, and there he dies. The monster finds him and lays over him, crying. Then he runs again.

This is a tragic story about loss, creation, and the need for companionship. I recommend it for anybody who is willing to sit through 50-some pages of put-me-to-sleep writing. If you get past the beginning, though, trust me. You won't be able to put it down.

So, if you want a late night thrill read that has some substance to it, try Mary Shelley's Frankenstein. I promise, you won't be disappointed. A love story with murder and deceit? Who wouldn't be interested?





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KatsK This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine. said...
May 5, 2012 at 6:32 pm
Yeah, we read it (Frankenstein) for school. I really liked it, and I'm glad that you did as well. Congrats on getting in the magazine, by the way.
 
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