On the Road This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine.

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     When my teacher presented us with our assignment, the expected groans followed. But while I pretended to be just as annoyed, I was secretly excited to delve into Kerouac’s On the Road. I had heard only good things about it, and as an avid reader, I could not help but smile at the opportunity. Of course, I would not let my friends catch a glimpse of my furtive enthusiasm.

I started reading that night and was not disappointed. The crazy characters were so much fun and the events of their travels were pure entertainment. Contentedly, I followed the aimless cross-country trips of Sal Paradise and Dean Moriarty.

Eventually, my attention dwindled. The book did not seem to be going anywhere. I had to force myself to continue. The due date was fast approaching, and Sal’s adventures just wouldn’t end. There were a lot of random people. The trips had become redundant, and I did not think I could absorb one more of Dean’s rants about the meaning of life. I finished the night before the book was due, and breathed a sigh of relief.

On the Road is the right book to read if you are looking for pointless entertainment, but if you want plot, conflict, or suspense, don’t expect to find it here. Yes, it provides an excellent window into America in the 1950s; yes, it has interesting characters, obscure settings, and lots of travel; but On the Road lacks unity and a storyline and definitely failed to captivate this reader.

This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine. This piece has been published in Teen Ink’s monthly print magazine.






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