Magazine, website & books written by teens since 1989

Evolution This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine.

By
They tried to teach me about Australopithecines
and the fossil record, Homo habilis and
the Cro-Magnon man, the Leakeys and
footprints in the ashes.
It all slipped from my fingers like
a slippery bar of soap in the shower –
except for those footprints.
I remembered the footprints because they
represented life, not death.
But as for the rest, who really cares?
Some people seemed very concerned
(something about God and Eve and mitochondria),
but why does it matter?
No one from that time is alive now,
except for maybe a few giant clams
(unless the scientists have killed them all).
What really matters now isn’t
the evolution of a species, but rather
the evolution of the individual. Like how I
once wanted to be a ballerina,
but now I want to be a professor,
or how my sister didn’t like to eat fish
until a few years ago.

This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine. This piece has been published in Teen Ink’s monthly print magazine.




Join the Discussion

This article has 8 comments. Post your own now!

Abcdefg said...
Nov. 10, 2010 at 9:46 pm

I understand that it may not matter for you, but certainly matters for knowledge and understanding of the natural world.

And I found your comment about scientists rather offensive. Modern scientists are some of the MOST respectful of people towards nature.

 
annexgrey This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine. said...
Sept. 10, 2010 at 6:56 am
This is great! I love how it offers a whole new perspective to the general idea of evolution in the science sense :)
 
Yoyo96 said...
Jun. 4, 2010 at 11:24 am
Good poem, and great meaning. But I didn't really like the ending....but that's just me. Good Job!
 
KrystalT replied...
Nov. 21, 2010 at 2:20 pm
I have to agree..
 
Eilatan This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine. said...
Jun. 4, 2010 at 5:27 am
This is really powerful! i love the ending, it leaves it on such a mysterious note, that's a part of a true poet. this is phenomenal, it belongs on the pages of the New Yorker. amazing.
 
E. H. said...
Feb. 24, 2009 at 4:58 pm
This is an awesome poem. I like its matter-of-fact, unpretentious tone; it really says something, instead of hiding behind flourishes of words. The very last line ("or how my sister ...") is just lovely.
 
sanra said...
Feb. 21, 2009 at 7:30 pm
This writing is very good.
It makes me wonder of how people always change their opinion about things
 
oneuponathyme said...
Nov. 22, 2008 at 7:15 am
I very much enjoyed this, esp. the ending.
 
Site Feedback