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The Arizona Imigration Law

By , Boulder, CO
Imagine if you were walking on the street and a police officer came up to you and asked you for proof that your were here in your own country legally. The police are allowed to ask for your papers if you “don’t belong”. That’s what the Arizona immigration law SB1070 says, but what exactly does “don’t belong” mean? Is it your skin color or how you talk or the way you act that makes you not belong? Answering this question has been a large problem in Arizona ever since the law was passed. For this and other reasons the law has been the topic of many heated debates. While some think that this law is a good law, most agree that it has many flaws and needs to be stricken from the law books: it encourages racial profiling; has hurt the economy; and makes people feel unsafe in there own communities.

The Arizona immigration law gives way to racial profiling. There is no doubt that it enables racial profiling in our police departments, allowing officers to ask somebody that has a different skin color for proof that they’re in this country legally. Kids will think it’s ok to profile people because of there race because the government can do it. Soon racial profiling will be seen in our schools, and amongst the youth. “The Arizona immigration law, SB1070, invites racial profiling against people of color by law enforcement in violation of the equal protection guarantee”, says the NAACP. (The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People). Adolfo, a Staten Island resident, said.”Everything changed after Arizona. You feel it. You feel insecure," he said. "You're treated like you don't belong, but we're here to work. We're raising families and contributing. Our children are American.” Adolfo was beaten near death outside his home in Staten Island New York. For his skin color and the way he talked. The affects of this law have been shown not just in Arizona but across the United States in Staten Island. As Adolfo said, people do not feel safe in there own house any more or in there own country.

Along with all of the civil rights problems, Arizona’s law is also hurting it’s economy. According to The New York Times, estimates of lost tourism revenue range from $15 million to $150 million. A lot of the vacations planned for Arizona have now been canceled and the large population of Hispanics that go to Arizona to visit there family have will now not be going in protest but also in fear of the new law. According to The New York Times, estimates of lost tourism revenue range from $15 million to $150 million .also many college students from University of Arizona and Arizona State have dropped out in protest of the law. And the states own basketball team the Phoenix Suns has protested the bill.


The Biggest negative of Arizona’s law SB1070 is that it makes people feel unsafe. “Imagine if you were an illegal immigrant and you knew of somebody who robbed a house. You probably would not call the police or tell them because you might then be asked for identification. There for the crime would go unreported and most likely unsolved. “Hispanics feel like a wanted criminal when really there just trying to live there life. Kids are supposed to feel safe when there is a police officer around but now Hispanics might feel threatened or betrayed by there own country and will no longer respect the officers. As Adolfo said, people do not feel safe in their own house any more or in there own country.



This law SB1070 is not good for Arizona or the U.S. Racial profiling will happen, and it will be a blow to our already hurting economy. This law will also not impede police from catching criminals and many will get away with it because of fear of the illegal’s fear of getting deported. As Americans we value freedom. Police asking people for identification because of their skin color is not freedom. This law is an insult to our American values and a civil rights disaster. It is also a ticking time bomb and is going to blow up in our face soon.





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HopefulWolf This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine. said...
May 25, 2011 at 8:24 pm

I believe this law is just, as long it is based on a legal system, not racism. If a non-U.S. citizen is questioned about their identity, then they should tell the truth. However, if they are being asked based on the color of their skin rather than papers, this is getting out of hand.

This controversy hit close to home when many local workers were fired due to their nationality. Well, they came right back after settling their paperwork. Problem solved.

Although, the problem isn't... (more »)

 
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