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Teenagers & Technology with Relationships

Most teenagers today, can't seem to imagine life without modern technology. Modern technology, has revamped the way of life for almost everyone. Teenagers today, use most of it for communication. The way teens communicate today, is completely different than the way teenagers ten to twenty year ago communicated.

Decades ago, no teenager was consumed in updating their Facebook status or texting their friends every two minutes. These are just some of the things that didn't seem possible then, due to the fact technology had not advanced that far then.

Teenagers are constantly consumed in new technology. Many teens don't spend that much time talking on the phone, even though cell phones give them the opportunity.

Recent studies have shown that about fifty percent of teenagers own a cell phone, but many only spend about 21 minutes per day actually engaging themselves within a conversation on the phone.

A one worded text message or simple Facebook post seems to be much easier. Type a few words into a message, and add hundreds of friends and it makes up for the long and possibly dreaded phone conversation. It also eliminates the hassle of meeting one another in person.

These options may be the most popular, and most efficient to teenagers these days, but is it the best? Through the years, it seems as if hanging out in person with someone has grown to be too much work. Person to person contact is quickly diminishing. A ton of teens have hundreds to thousands of friends of Facebook. Sure, they may know all those people. Does that mean they are all friends? How many people actually set aside time to spend with all of their cyber “friends.” Acquaintances, seems to be a better fitting title.

Although, with the constant rise and emergence of new tools for teenagers, parents have almost become used to the fact that their kids do not physically hang out with their friends. Either some have jumped on the bandwagon, or they just let their teenagers be teenagers. There are parents that are totally against this modern tech savvy society. Sources have reported that “a quarter of parents” of tech savvy teens have also, “went the same technology route.” Parents with smartphones, and members of social networking websites, most likely, will distance themselves from physical communication as well.

Could it be that, parents will soon prefer texting their kids instead of face to face communication? In today's world, it seems almost a necessity to be connected through technology. It's just the way the world works now. It may be taking it a bit too far if parents are no longer fond of personal contact with their own kids.

If that is true, it has been taken too far. TV could be the use of technology. It's definitely more advanced than ten years ago. It is an activity you can do with friends or family in one room, at one time. You can communicate as a family and still watch tv. Watching a tv show can be stimulating to some degree and adding in the aspect of watching television with family members, would bring you closer together.
Teenagers are not incapable of playing sports outdoors with their friends. Unfortunately, teens have grown increasingly lazy. Sports keep a person active and allow them to interact with a group of people without having your head in your phone. People used to do it all the time, even ten years ago. Not many teenagers were how to communicate with people, without actually seeing their face. People were not nearly as lazy, because they went outside and made use of their time socially.

It is clear and has been for quite some time now that technology has transformed us. How far could it take our population? Students will continue to let technology take them over, and have their parents follow, if we don't try and get out of the house once and awhile. It would be really different to see what it would be like as a society to disregard those “much needed” electronics for awhile. Would it be possible?



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