Google, God, and Mashed Potatoes

By , Hermitage, PA
Google me, you’ll see.

That was possibly the most interesting end to an argument. I guess it is supposed to be threatening in some way. It was one the few times I turned my head to see from where the words were outpouring in the messy, garbage strewn hallway of my high school. Two computer geniuses were having a heated quarrel, charging at each other with their RAMS and trying to outdo the other in terms of internet popularity. It left me thinking how much our lives are woven into the intricate workings of the World Wide Web. So much that I can use Google as a comeback.

Knowing famous people used to make you famous. Running a marathon used to make you revered. Having a pleasant personality used to get you far in life, but not anymore.

As I scrutinize colleges, I’m constantly being told that they, in turn, will be investigating their applicants’ social life through Google searches. It’s nice to know I’ll be one of those 34,000 searches made per second on Google, yet my future will completely depend upon the results.

I hope the time I flung mashed potatoes at my teacher or the time I got pulled over for a blown taillight doesn’t show up in my own search results. These days, I wouldn’t be surprised if I searched “god” and it’d just take me back to the Google homepage. All my wrongdoings are known to Google just like God knows all my sins.

We can’t hide. We could create new identities, maybe, but “you've done it, said it, clicked it, searched it, Googled it. You can never undo it or unclick it” says Frida Ghitis a writer of CNN. Maybe we need to accept the inevitable. The internet, while it provides us immense, free- of-charge entertainment on those boring nights, makes us pay by releasing our whereabouts on that night (or any night) through something like Facebook. It’s a give and take relationship, so I think I’ll stick around.

On the other hand, I want to be more than just a search result. I AM more than just a test score. I have been to third world countries and helped the poor. I spend hours pouring over my choral repertoire and love the idea of time travel with a deep, burning passion. But, no one can see this from my search results. And even if they get an inkling of my personality, I am suddenly no different than all the others.

When the admissions board asks me why I should get into the University, I’ll simply say to Google me and they’ll see. Be sure to takes notes too, I’ll mention, because that’s more than I can ever say about myself. I’ll trust God will do all the work.





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