Television

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Wake up. Turn on the TV. Come home from work. Turn on the TV. Eat dinner. Turn on the TV. Does this seem like your daily routine? Does television have a poignant effect on your life? Hello, my name is Evan and I am a world renowned family psychologist. Allow me to analyze your issue and provide the necessary guidelines to improve your life.

After a long day at work or school, you are probably inundated over frivolous paperwork or that upcoming presentation you have to give. Television is a useful and convenient stress-reliever and is okay once in awhile, but not all the time. A.C. Nielsen Co. stated that an average American will spend nine years of his or her life watching TV. Do you want to be this person? If not, consider exercise as an alternative for a stress-reliever. You may be phlegmatic about the idea at first, but you may have a garbled impression on what could be considered exercise.

When presented with the word, “exercise,” you may think of lifting weights or doing sprints. However, I would like to corroborate for you that exercise can be a walk with the dog, or playing Frisbee with your friends. Making exercise enjoyable for you will diminish your stress, improve your sleep, and even give you a more sanguine mood. I am not trying to coerce you into exercising; I am merely suggesting an alternative. You can potentially gain comprehensive benefits.

The average American has a television on in his or her household for almost seven hours each day. For this, I have one thing to say to you: don’t be average. Average is fruitless. Television—like junk food—is fine in moderation, but if you attain a zeal for exercise, you will be rewarded, both physically and mentally.





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