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The Power of Little Black Squares

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Recently I have found myself saying, “Kids these days.” Since these words are typically muttered from the lips of the elderly, I laugh at myself for sounding like such a grandma. But it’s true. I am only six years older than my brother Jack, yet the focus of our childhood could not be more different. I grew up learning and imagining. For toys, I was given Barbies and stuffed animals which I lovingly cared for and pretended were real. My mom read me a story every night, and I was only allowed to watch PBS on TV. Jack grew up with his eyes were glued to a screen. He was given a GameBoy, a GameCube, and a Wii. He and my mom play a game on her cell phone before bed. He watches at least two hours of television everyday, and is infatuated with whatever he is watching, even if it is an episode he has seen three times. But can you blame him? There are at least 5 kids in his 4th grade class that have cell phones they use regularly.

Do not misunderstand me; I depend on the power of technology as much as the next person. I rely on the internet to look up every bit of information I need to know and I communicate largely through my cell phone, but I cannot help but wonder how different I might be today if I hag grown up with all of that power. Would I, too, be watching Spongebob Squarepants and repeating lines like “I’m just an idiot”? Would I have an iPod Touch in my pocket, with complete access to the internet waiting to be explored?

Reading and playing as a child shaped who I am today. Whether I was jump-roping outside, playing “House” with my friends, or having a lemonade stand, I was learning valuable lifeskills. Can you imagine a future world that grew up shooting virtual soldiers for personal entertainment?





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i_am_nobody said...
Mar. 5, 2010 at 8:27 pm
it is true that technology changes things but, when you get down to it, childhood is childhood. i grew up teaching my parents how to use their cell phones; yet today (6 years later) ive only had one for about two months. i hav 2 computer/technology classes a week but the fact that i know an alternative way too looking at things didnt change a thing. id still be the me who would rather do strength training than go to the movies. evolution happens but it doesnt really change the basics.
 
A-Nonymous said...
Mar. 5, 2010 at 4:54 pm
I completely agree with you! I have noticed the same thing with my youngest sister. This was very well written!
 
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