Magazine, website & books written by teens since 1989

Kindles vs. Libraries

By
Libraries are in serious danger. These places of learning are being replaced by a more
modern piece of equipment. This piece of equipment is smaller than a library. It is smaller than
a book. It is sophisticated and may very well revolutionized our way of reading. As thin as a
pencil, the Kindle is taking over. There are a few different views to this.
My mother and father both use a Kindle. I have used a Kindle myself to read books. I
must say, they are not bad devices. My mom gets ALL of her reading from the Kindle. I have
grown up reading books, as electronic reading devices are relatively new. My parents obviously
have read paper books. With experience at both ends of the spectrum, I must choose books
over Kindles. It is wrong for Kindles to replace books. Books have been around for hundreds of
years. Kindles are brand new. With so much tradition and culture that comes with books, it
would be a nearly impossible task to replace books. One may think, it’s just like Red Box
replacing Blockbuster. It’s not. Blockbuster was not around for hundreds of years. Maybe a
decade or so. With Blockbuster being so new, in the scheme of things, Red Box was just
another step up the technology ladder. Books are a thing so old, it’s best just to leave them be
and continue to use them. I appreciate the convenience of Kindles, an entire library in the palm
of your hand, it can be read in the dark, it’s lightweight and compact, the font size can be
changed for easier reading. It’s just that they pose a threat and if their massive popularity gain
continues, they will replace libraries.
Here’s another problem: if Kindles replace libraries, how will they be distributed to
every person? There simply isn’t any feasible way. Our tax dollars support libraries and keep
them free for everyone to use. Are we going to add a tax to support Kindles so that they will be
free to everyone? Will there be Kindle Kiosks where you can check out an electronic reader?
Or will they just be issued to every person everywhere? Kindles are expensive, and that doesn’t
count the cost of buying the electronic books from Amazon.com. The nice thing about libraries
is they are free and open to everyone. A nice place to do quiet studying. They offer a shelter
for those with an interest in education. They are a place to read and unwind. And for families
not fortunate enough to own a computer, they offer those too. And if libraries are torn down,
where are the books going to go?
In your decision to have libraries stay or go, voice your opinion by your choice in
supporting the Kindle or not. Books have been with us for millions of years, it seems. They are
works of art. Kindles are great machines. But like all electronics, Kindles will eventually be
replaced by other gadgets. Don’t let that impact the destiny of books. Don’t let Kindles destroy
our libraries. Don’t forget about books, for they are in grave danger.





Join the Discussion

This article has 4 comments. Post your own now!

CP3bigplay said...
Jan. 7, 2010 at 5:11 pm
I don't have a Kindle. (ha! what a coincidence. I read this article and there is an ad for the Kindle device on the side..)
I love the library. I love the feeling of having a book in my hand. I love to hear that sound you get when you turn a crisp page. I'd lose some of that if libraries go out. I am also just starting to read a lot more than I used to. I don't want to pay money for a book, where I could just get it for free down the street.
Also, where would kids go... (more »)
 
WriterFanatic This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine. said...
Jan. 6, 2010 at 4:32 pm
You are correct. Where would the Ancient Egyptians have been without paprus scrolls? What would our founding fathers have been like if they were not well read? A Kindle is a very nice peace of tech. But, books are so wonderful. YOu can feel a book. You can urn the pages. By ouching it, you might get more wrapped up in the story. In the Kindle, you can't do that.
 
Strawberry123 said...
Jan. 3, 2010 at 8:46 pm
i have to say... kindles do reduce paper and all but they are expensive to buy, as are the books to read them on!
 
Urbs2013 This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine. replied...
Jan. 4, 2010 at 8:34 am
simply an amazing article, and I've been thinking the same thing for quite some time.
 
bRealTime banner ad on the left side
Site Feedback