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Immoral Exceptionalism

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Sometimes I wish I weren’t part of the human species, for I am ashamed of what it’s done to the earth, to home. We forget that it is not just for our use, we forget that other innocent animals call this their home as well, and because of this, we forget to share. One of the first things a child learns, whether in home or at school, is how to share. We share with each other, despite differences in skin color, ethnicity, gender, religious belief, age, political affiliation, educational background and more. Why don’t we apply a similar logic to sharing the earth with all of nature’s creatures? Many people would argue that humans don’t have to, that we are here to govern over how the world works. They would also defend the idea that we are exceptional compared to all other species because of our ability to have morals.
I beg to differ. We pollute, and know it’s bad because we can see the effects, yet we continue to do it. We cut trees, whole forests, down selfishly, and most of us never think twice about recycling when throwing any form of paper or cardboard into the garbage. We litter our oceans with our waste, where the fish we eat are the same ones that eat our trash, mistaking it for food, which puts a whole new meaning to not s****** where you eat. We steal from, murder, and gamble with nature. We may have some sense of morality, but claiming the title “exceptional” would be lying to ourselves, and furthermore, immoral. I will not deny that there have been many exceptional thoughts and actions from the human species, but looking at the damage we’ve done and continue to do, I’d say that we’re not so exceptional after all. The blood on our hands is there as evidence, and although it can’t be washed clean, it can show us where we went wrong.




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dragonbiscuits This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine. said...
Mar. 10, 2010 at 5:50 pm:
*claps* This was fantastic! You said a lot in just a small amount of text! I wish there were more people like you, the world would be a much better place!
 
kadyladystone This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine. replied...
Mar. 11, 2010 at 1:55 am :
Thanks so much! :)
 
Threefiddy replied...
Apr. 25, 2010 at 4:56 am :

There are more trees now than over 100 years ago. It is a renewable resource.

I have to say this whenever somebody brings up that we are depleting our supply of lumber.

 
dragonbiscuits This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine. replied...
Apr. 25, 2010 at 9:21 am :

Of course trees are a renewable resource; if our rate of consumption is greater than that of the rate of growth, there will be a horrific decline of trees.

Also, even thought I don't have the exact numbers, there is a significantly less amount of forests today then there was a hundred years ago.  Where, exactly, are these trees you speak of? Are they very young and in greenhouses and nurseries, instead of in forests? 

 
kadyladystone This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine. replied...
Apr. 25, 2010 at 5:28 pm :

Of course there may be more trees now than in 1900, because in 1900, we had just finished the era of deforestation for timber.  But no one knows exactly for sure how many trees there were before deforestation. Sure, we've replanted trees since then, but how do we know if there's been any net gain?  

And as far as what I wrote in "Immoral Exceptionalism" dealing with deforestation, I'm not just talking about the U.S.  Worldwide, we have less trees than we used to at any p... (more »)

 
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