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Shrimp or Sun Chips?


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The current generation has a myriad of problems. We complain too much, we watch television too much, we are on the computer too much, and we sleep too much. The list goes on and on. Nothing seems to be right with the current generation. Although we manage to do so many things wrong, one problem tops them all. The biggest crisis with teenagers of today is our obsession with social media. Whether it is texting, blogging, or Facebook, teenagers are losing the ability to interact face to face with their peers.

Currently, practically every high school student, their mom, dad, cat, gold fish and 5 year old sister have a Facebook account. We can’t forget about the kids with Twitter, Tumblr, Instagram, or even the creeper named Tom who still has a Myspace account. All of these websites, no matter how simple, repetitive, or boring, managed to utilize some of every person’s time. It is hard to pin point where the entertainment value comes from by stalking an ex-boyfriend or the new kid at school. Social media, particularly Facebook, has taken over some people’s minds. If this website doesn’t rule their every waking second, then it is at least stumbled upon daily. Nowadays there are people who practically tell you every second of their life’s events through Twitter. They seem to want to share what food they made for breakfast, when they used the bathroom, and they absolutely love to broadcast their conversations over the internet for the world to see. These people are the ones who may actually need to find a life or some psychological help. Of course the annoying problem doesn’t end there. On top of that, no one wants to see that annoying couple posting how much they love each other or how they are arguing about whether shrimp or sun chips are better. Not only does no one care about their one week long relationship, but I am forced to see this blabbering daily. It begins to a raise question, does this generation has any real life social skills at all?

If this strictly online interaction continues, the pandemic may spread to generations to come. Maybe our grandchildren won’t even know the experience of holding a conversation in person. The only way to cure this issue is to stop sharing every moment online. Maybe meet a friend somewhere, and talk to them in person. Teenagers need to stop sharing their bathroom schedules with the internet world, living a love life over statuses, posting 300 profile pictures, and most of all, they really don’t need to tell us that they are arguing with their girlfriend about shrimp and sun chips.




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