Still Not Colorblind MAG

January 31, 2009
By Aaron S. BRONZE, Zebulon, North Carolina
Aaron S. BRONZE, Zebulon, North Carolina
2 articles 0 photos 0 comments

I often heard about the presidential election on the news. You probably did too, if you expose yourself at all to the sickly sun of the American media. Journalists, reporters, and every other member of the information army practically wet themselves with exultation at the election of the United States’ first African-American president. And so have American citizens. There are still “Obama ’08” signs in yards, on cars, bridges, babies, and anything else that can be decorated with that godly O – his supporters still have that smug smirk glued like a bumper sticker across their faces.

Reading this, you might come to the conclusion that I am a rabid racist and torch-waving conservative, but hear me out! I am not a racist – in fact, I am almost certainly more colorblind than you, Obamanite. Barack Obama is now America’s first black president. You may say “Hooray!” but I say “So what?” You might tout his victory as a sign that racism is dead, and equal opportunity is, if not here, then well on its way. I disagree.

Racism is discrimination. Discrimination is not simply the act of deriding or oppressing a particular race. I believe it is any emphasis of racial differences. If a caucasian sees himself as “white” and identifies with others of his skin tone to form a coalition promoting his race, this is racist. By this logic, pro-black coalitions are racist too. And those who vaunt Obama’s presidency as a victory for African-American people are included.

In my experience, modern society is not discriminatory in its presentation of opportunity. There are black CEOs; there are white hobos; there are ­members of every race in every position. It’s the beauty of America! And yet still some insist on highlighting Obama’s victory as something strange and wonderful. Not only is it an insult to the American spirit to be fascinated by a black president, it’s an insult to those who have fought for this spirit.

The proper response to Obama’s election should have been: “We have a new president. Will he do a good job?” It is foolish to think that just because Obama is black, he will do a good job. Those who share my opinion see Obama not as racial crusader in shining armor, but as a politician whose ­actions must be analyzed logically. In short, the fact that America still ­perceives races as “different” is shameful. In a land of equal opportunity, the best will win – and the best has been chosen.

Celebrating Obama’s victory in a racial context is simply celebrating past racial divides. The election was not a victory for African-Americans, but a victory for all Americans.



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This article has 210 comments.


on May. 16 2013 at 8:14 pm
Awesome article :) Keep writing :)

on Feb. 3 2013 at 2:06 pm
The_girl_at_her_desk SILVER, Delhi, Kentucky
6 articles 0 photos 13 comments
you know thats politics. i happen to live in India and i every time i see people being selected or not selected on the basis of thier caste. As someone who has never experienced the hardships of the "lower" caste, i do feel that's wrong. but if i change my perspective a bit, put myself in thier shoes, i really do understand it.

wi234 said...
on Dec. 22 2012 at 12:12 pm
wi234, Boston, Massachusetts
0 articles 0 photos 18 comments
While some good points are made in this essay i feel you are deeply misguided. blacks in this nation still face discrimination and are not treated equally to think oherwise would be ignoring the facts. 

on Sep. 11 2012 at 10:22 pm
Jon Hollis BRONZE, Atlanta, Georgia
2 articles 0 photos 13 comments
What is wrong with you? It's wrong to celebrate an African American becoming president? After so many years of strife, in a country where, at one point, black people weren't even allowed to read, a black man holds the highest possible postion you can obtain, and rejoicing about that is wrong? I know you said you didn't like people voting for Obama just cause he's black, but how much did that matter? Obama won because he was a better politician than Mccain. Obama won by a large margin, you know.

on Sep. 11 2012 at 10:14 pm
Jon Hollis BRONZE, Atlanta, Georgia
2 articles 0 photos 13 comments
your assumptions are idealistic. This would be completely true and color-blindness would be perfect if there was indeed equal opportunity. But, because of discrimination and inequality in history, we must, for the time being, acknowledge race and take steps toward undoing the inequality that has been woven into the fabric of our society and would otherwise continue even without active discrimination.

on Sep. 11 2012 at 10:11 pm
Jon Hollis BRONZE, Atlanta, Georgia
2 articles 0 photos 13 comments
Finally, an intelligent person.

on Sep. 11 2012 at 10:10 pm
Jon Hollis BRONZE, Atlanta, Georgia
2 articles 0 photos 13 comments
I bet you would, wouldn't you? You know who else would? All the other backwards, 'revese racism' believers. It's appaling, almost, for some people to see others succeed and think of it as a disadvantage to themselves. Obama won because he was a better politician than McCain. Quit making up excuses.

on Jul. 13 2012 at 12:52 pm
Desmothenes Locke GOLD, Cresskill, New Jersey
13 articles 0 photos 21 comments
Finally... someone said it! Voting for Obama because he is black is just as bad as not voting for him because he is black.

on Jul. 2 2012 at 4:54 pm
SingingismylifeSYV BRONZE, Sarasota, Florida
1 article 0 photos 6 comments

Favorite Quote:
"do you like music?"
~"do you like breathing?"

Honestly, I feel this article could not have been better said! I have respect for Obama, but I think many voted him in for the WRONG reasons. I don't think color of skin should be this much of a shock to America! Hahah. Really great article though! 

on Jun. 4 2012 at 7:50 pm
Different people in the world receive the business loans from various creditors, because that's fast and easy.

on Apr. 10 2012 at 4:55 pm
AndSoItGoes01 GOLD, Reno, Nevada
10 articles 0 photos 149 comments

Favorite Quote:
"The winter I told you icicles are magic, you stole an enormous icicle from my neighbors shingle, and gave it to me as a gift, I kept it in my freezer for seven months. Love isn't always magic, sometimes it's melting." -Andrea Gibson

There is nothing to say except you are a brilliant writer and have a rare point of view that others (including myself) can only dream of..... I can say that i would be HONORED to read a book that you write any say !!!!!!!!!!!

on Feb. 26 2012 at 2:41 pm
Anny_Grace SILVER, Centennial, Colorado
9 articles 0 photos 22 comments
Wow! Amzingly wirtten love your voice in it. And I applud you for speaking out, I feel just the same way. Hopefully you can bring this to attention. Great work!

Dipsy said...
on Feb. 4 2012 at 8:37 pm
Dipsy, Cresco, Iowa
0 articles 0 photos 5 comments

Favorite Quote:
"The only place where success comes before work is in the dictionary"

I never would have ever thought it in this way. I don't have any constructive criticism because that was truely amazing.

Veritasrmc said...
on Feb. 4 2012 at 7:58 pm
I'm African-American and I'm NOT an Obama supporter. In fact, I never have been. However, that doesn't mean I was extremely pleased when he was voted into office. Despite what you may think, his election WAS a great victory for African-Americans. Fifty years ago, such a concept was unheard of. African-Americans were one of the most oppressed races, and now an African-American is one of the most powerful men in the word. If that isn't victory or triumph, I don't know what is. That's NOT being racist, it's being realistic. And when there's a woman president, I'll cheer just as loudly for her. When there's a Native American president, I'll cheer just as loudly. When there's a Jewish president, I'll be just as pleased. Whatever the case, being colorblind is not the solution.

on Jan. 13 2012 at 10:38 pm
TeamTamani SILVER, Adams, Tennessee
9 articles 0 photos 17 comments

Favorite Quote:
"I don't need a cloak to become invisible."-Albus Dumbledore
"Fear of a name increases fear of a thing itself."-Albus Dumbledore
"By all means continue destroying my possessions. I daresay I have too many."-Albus Dumbledore

I never really saw it like this, I like your perspective of writing. Keep on keeping on!

on Jan. 13 2012 at 9:47 pm
RoseMonster GOLD, Plainville, Connecticut
12 articles 0 photos 7 comments
wow. You know, I never thought of it that way,and honestly, I think this helps answer a lot of difficult questions people may have about race. Reading this, I realize that race really doesn't exist at all, at least in the sense that it is some highly distinguishing quality. Instead of thinking "he's black" or "she's white", it should be "we're human". Thanks for a great piece and a real mind-opener!

on Jan. 13 2012 at 7:15 pm
frankota BRONZE, Santa Cruz, California
1 article 0 photos 1 comment
I agree with you, I also really hate how there are seperate channels on TV for different races, couldn't we just incorporate more people of different races into all of the shows?

hallie523 said...
on Dec. 22 2011 at 9:02 pm
hallie523, Seattle, Washington
0 articles 0 photos 16 comments
I agree with you mostly, but your assumptions are idealistic. This would be completely true and color-blindness would be perfect if there was indeed equal opportunity. But, because of discrimination and inequality in history, we must, for the time being, acknowledge race and take steps toward undoing the inequality that has been woven into the fabric of our society and would otherwise continue even without active discrimination.

on Dec. 22 2011 at 6:22 pm
blackswan42 SILVER, Cortlandt Manor, New York
5 articles 0 photos 6 comments
I agree that we should look at Obama as a strong president or a weak president, not as a black president. But becoming completely "color-blind" is not the solution. We don't have to hide our differences- we should celebrate them. So yes, Obama's election was a symbolic and literal victory for African Americans, and a demonstration of America's progress. Perhaps in an ideal world we would not notice skin color, but this is not an ideal world, and the scars of our racist past are still very visible. Refusing to acknowledge race would just be a weak attempt to cover up those scars and forget our past struggles. Instead, we should celebrate the signs that they are healing.

XandraAli said...
on Nov. 30 2011 at 3:09 pm
I love this, I couldn't agree more, well except that I don't believe the election was any kind of victory, why should we care what race someone is? Does that make them a good or bad leader? If not, then it should not have any influence on our decision.


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