Why Teenagers Shouldn't Vote

February 20, 2008
By Tanner Holm, Kaysville, UT

Wars, disease, political chaos, moral ambiguity and overall confusion; these are just some of the key phrases used to describe this generation. However, after reading an article heralding teens and demanding the ability for teens to vote, I was compelled to speak out against what could be a disastrous misconception.

There are a couple reasons teens aren’t allowed to vote until they are old enough to have been given the opportunity to graduate from High School. Firstly because they, we, just don’t know enough to make a major decision. We don’t have the knowledge, the experience as a whole to change the world for better just yet, and frankly, many of us don’t gain that knowledge or experience until quite a while down the road. That’s why we go to high school, to educate ourselves so we can make knowledgeable, decisive choices that will turn out well for everyone affected. Just picture this, you have a young child anxiously standing in front of you, his eyes shifting from the gum drop machine to the quarter in your hand. You give him the option of either using the quarter to buy a gumball, or he can invest it in a savings account to use later in life when he really needs it. Without a doubt, the young child would instantly snatch that quarter out of your hand and mere seconds later be chewing that gum, and why, do you ask? Because he doesn’t know any better! He doesn’t have the foresight to see the impact of his decision, nor does he have the long-term endurance to choose what is best for him. He just doesn’t get it. But with a little education, say a high school diploma’s worth, could change all of that. In fact, it could change the world.

Another reason that teen voting is just plain unconstitutional is that we have not made an impact or definitively contributed to society. We have done nothing but take, take from our parents, take from our schools, take from our government. It is not until the age of eighteen that we become true citizens of our country, because that is the time when people begin to reciprocate the investment made in them as children and teenagers and contribute to our society, propelling us ever forward. That is the time when we become a member of society, so that is the time when our voice is granted unto us. The laws we abide by are made for adults, by adults. And face it, one of these days we’ll all be adults. Enjoy teenage-hood while it lasts.


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This article has 6 comments.


iYuko said...
on Apr. 24 2015 at 5:06 pm
@Ben Dover What kind of cookies?

Ben Dover said...
on Mar. 21 2013 at 9:50 am
I like Pie and cookies and i weigh 700 pounds

cam111111 said...
on Nov. 21 2011 at 12:17 pm
Do you remeber the name of the article you read that you mention in the first paragraph about how teens should get a say? i am righting a research paper on this topic and it would be great to use the article that sparked your opinion

rockyraccoon said...
on Jun. 17 2011 at 10:34 pm
rockyraccoon, Fort Wayne, Indiana
0 articles 0 photos 54 comments

Favorite Quote:
today tommorow next month next year all look remarkably gray.

i agree that the voteing age should't change but the way you put it have to disagree with i know several teens who think about the word and teens as much info as any whon else. Also im not sure you will start thinking about the world just because they turn 18.

on Oct. 28 2010 at 11:03 am
Hey, I just think that if you're going to try and make a proper argument against lowering the voting age to 16, etc., then at least you should make sure that spelling and grammar mistakes aren't included as well. And in regards to your points, I'd just like to say that a lot of adults also are uneducated about politics, and are still voting based on history, or family, and are influenced by friends. It's not like once we're 18, we'll all magically be able to think purely based on which person will be the best president, etc. There's a lot more that goes into who we vote for than just age - past experiences, childhood, friends, and ethnicity. 18 is not the "magical number" when we suddenly have the ability to vote responsibly; it's something that comes with experience. There are plenty of 16 year-olds out there that ARE responsible, and end up paying taxes because they work and such. Yet, they don't have a say in how much tax is paid because they don't have a vote! Voter apathy is only due to the fact that our issues aren't being represented, and we begin to believe that our government doesn't care about what we think. So yes, I believe that the voter age should be lowered to the age of 16.

Hey, I just think that if you're going to try and make a proper argument against lowering the voting age to 16, etc., then at least you should make sure that spelling and grammar mistakes aren't included as well.

 

And in regards to your points, I'd just like to say that a lot of adults also are uneducated about politics, and are still voting based on history, or family, and are influenced by friends.

 

It's not like once we're 18, we'll all magically be able to think purely based on which person will be the best president, etc. There's a lot more that goes into who we vote for than just age - past experiences, childhood, friends, and ethnicity.

 

18 is not the "magical number" when we suddenly have the ability to vote responsibly; it's something that comes with experience.

 

There are plenty of 16 year-olds out there that ARE responsible, and end up paying taxes because they work and such. Yet, they don't have a say in how much tax is paid because they don't have a vote!

 

Voter apathy is only due to the fact that our issues aren't being represented, and we begin to believe that our government doesn't care about what we think.

 

So yes, I believe that the voter age should be lowered to the age of 16.


Sweet pea said...
on Feb. 10 2009 at 7:48 pm
I love this article I am writing a pros and cons article and this site really helps


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