After All, We're Only Human

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We live in a sophisticated world. We are surrounded by constant reminders of our complexity, and the incredible feat we have achieved by dominating nature. It is often easy to forget that we are human. We are not meant to behave in the way we do today. Society has conditioned us to cloak our primitive desires and thoughts and replace them with the guises of modern normalties. This is why we are sometimes too critical of ourselves, and find it hard to accept and the love the people we truly are.


We live in a world where mistakes are constantly punished. We are taught to know better. At a young age we are constantly reminded that seemingly natural things like sexual desires, selfishness, and anger are not appropriate. We are taught to repress our urges, always consider the feelings of others, and never lose our tempers. All of these alterations of our innate personalities may be beneficial, yet there seems to always loom a sense of guilt when we stray from our expected etiquette. Why should we feel guilty for experiencing sexual desires, or selfishness, or rage? They are things we cannot supress. We never feel guilty for being hot when the temperature outside is sweltering. We never feel guilt when our stomachs growl with hunger. So why does society insist that certain inherent urges and emotions are not civilized or even sinful?


The only way to view ourselves realistically is to accept the fact that we are not perfect, and that we cannot realistically behave as if we were. We are, after all, animals. We fear, we lust, we desire, we hate, we envy, and we constantly reprimand eachother for feeling these completely natural emotions. If we want to be happy with ourselves, we must stop pretending as if we are capable of overcoming the many human vices that nature has bestowed so kindly upon us. We are imperfect, and luckily so. For it is indeed our flaws that make us human.





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