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Money Can Buy Happiness

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Money Can Buy Happiness
I am ambivalent about few things in life, but when it comes to money I am torn. On one hand, I do realize that I can be happy without money as the best things in life, such as the love of my family and friends, can't be bought. On the other hand, I do believe that money can also bring a great deal of happiness. "Money can't buy happiness," is a saying that was coined either by a nincompoop or the fox who couldn't get the grapes. Money, without a doubt, does buy a lot of very real happiness. It has bought me plenty.
First, I am now attending FIS. Going to school here is far better than being stuck in a claustrophobic Japanese school. However, FIS costs ?132,000 per month plus ?10,000 for transportation to school plus miscellaneous fees of ?10,000 per month for parties, trips, costumes, etc. Yes, my school is far from free.
Without money I wouldn't be attending FIS. That's a fact. It's also true that I would be miserable attending a Japanese school. My future education will also have a big price tag attached. I plan to go to university for at least six years. We know how light that will make my parents' wallets. Education is expensive these days, and as I like learning, having money to pay the bills makes me quite happy.

Secondly, I need to escape Japan and retreat to Canada once in a while. The round trip costs ?120,000. Expensive! Money, of course, pays for this excursion which happily reunites me with my loved ones in the land of the maple leaf. When I'm there, we do things like ski, skate, camp, etc. All of these things also decrease my family's piggy bank. If my family didn't have the funds to cover these expenses, I would be stuck in Japan full-time, bored out of my wits. Once again, money does buy my happiness.
Thirdly, money has paid for my "happy" smile. I was born with a small jaw and large teeth, so I've had to become friends with the orthodontist. Orthodontic treatment isn't covered by medical insurance here, so my parents have shelled out more than a million yen to pay for my attractive pearly whites. Without money, I would have crooked, overlapping teeth, and would never be able to smile confidently even if I were happy. Honestly speaking, every time I think about my nice teeth, and how money helped me be able to smile confidently, I beam even more brightly.
Lastly, I like to sing, and joining a choir here is pricey because I have to pay for lesson fees, robes, trips, concerts, etc. For example, when we perform at the Symphony Hall, it costs my parents ?30,000 each time. Without money, I wouldn't be participating in the Muzen Kranz choir. There would be no one to help me sing or no one to sing with. I would have fewer friends and less talent. You might think that anyone can learn to sing without paying these high prices, but European classical music isn't something you can do without a voice coach, and a voice coach here is costly. I enjoy singing and I dedicate a lot of my time and energy to it. It fulfills me. This is further proof that money does buy happiness.
I will never believe that I can't be happy without money because I am well aware of and thankful for the best things in life, which do happen to be free. I have some good pals who I enjoy spending time with. I have excellent health, which I give thanks for everyday. I also have the ability to help others, which brings me a lot of satisfaction. I admit this. However, I also believe that there are certain happinesses that money can buy.
Without money, I would be a crooked-toothed boy attending a Japanese school and stuck permanently in Japan without being able to sing. I wouldn't be happy that way. I am a fox who has tasted the grapes. They taste good. As a person who has been blessed with having enough money, I know that it buys things like a good education, and chances to see my family, sing, and smile about it all confidently. Money has bought a lot of my happiness, and I am appreciative of this and never take it for granted.



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