Become Motivated This work is considered exceptional by our editorial staff.

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I'm sure, by now many of you whom have visited my website know that I am an aspiring journalist. Another obvious fact is that I am still in high school and only 16 years old. Both online as well as in my real life I tend to always get asked, “how did you do that?” or get described as “lucky” I wouldn't go so far as to say I am 'lucky', but I do know what I want and I am set upon getting it!

The journalism industry – like any other – is hard to crack into and one cannot get too far without specific qualifications, but not to say you cannot start making baby steps. Below, I have compiled a few tips on how to set and achieve goals you make as well as share with you a few good pointers on taking the stride to making something of yourself one day.

Paint a picture!
It may be cliche, but it is probably the best advice you could ever receive; visualise your dream! May it be being a world famous hockey player, a master chef or just a successful owner of a corporate company. Whatever you may have your heart set on start moulding the pieces together in your mind. The best way to think about it is by imagining your life as either a movie or a book; the scenes or chapters being the main milestones or events. The best thing about this is that it is all a part of your private thoughts, so if you are a bit shy on sharing your feelings to the world, then it is all for you to enjoy and to grow on until you are confident enough to share them.

Two words, Vision Board! Okay, the concept has been made popular by the Queen of Talk herself, Oprah Winfrey but collecting pictures of what you aspire to attain and placing them together into a collage has been around for some time. Thing is, the proof is in the pudding; it has been recorded that people who have their own vision boards are far more motivated than others who have none. The trick? Gather images of your dream house, career, car and anything else you may want. A vision board does not necessarily mean it needs to be a big board hoisted up for all to see – I used to have a vision board, but soon it turned into a vision book. I carry it everywhere I go to motivate and remind me of what I want and where I am going – it also is an easy way to explain in conversation certain things others may not understand.
A few things in my vision book are:
Pictures of my dream job, becoming a journalist
Pictures of my dream house and car
Pictures of myself and my mentor, Debora Patta
A special autograph from someone I hold in high regard – no names needing to be mentioned

The talented rise, as long as there is a culture of enabling it.
We all thrive on the acceptance of others and we all need friends and family – no doubt about it. Make certain to surround yourself with individuals whom are proud of your achievements and don't make a mockery of you for them. I do not know how many times I have been in a situation with someone where I'm left thinking 'who in the world are you?' It is pettiness on their behalf and displays how immature they are in their thinking.

There's no 'I' in team? And where is the 'u' in me?
Everyone else? It seems our own self-achievement is no more important. First comes the public and then ourselves? I think not! Never forget that whatever you set out to do you are doing for yourself; not your mother and not your dog. At the end of the day you should be the one satisfied with the end results.

My parting advice? Believe in your capabilities and never lose your focus. Remember, it is 10% talent and 90% hard work. Persistence and determination pays off, look where it has got me. ?





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Emmalee This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine. said...
Sept. 11, 2009 at 10:52 am
I agree with you when you say it is about yourself and not about everyone else. What I do, I do for myself. However, I believe that talent is more than ten percent of the mixture. For instance, if you don't have the talent to sing, then no one will tell you that you are a good singer. If no one tells you that you are good, why would anyone put forth the hard work that you say is ninety percent? Keep writing. I keep up with you.
 
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