Eau De Meat, Anyone?

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Burger King’s manly meat body spray is literally flying off the shelves. Originally selling for a mere $3.99 a bottle, you can now only find it on Ebay for a minimum of $79. Apparently there’s a blooming market for “fragrances that recreate body odors.” (Daum)

Rachel Herz, a psychology professor at Brown University and the author of The Scent of Desire: Discovering Our Enigmatic Sense of Smell, said that Burger King’s body spray will not soon go out of style. "Meat is at the top of the list in terms of male-rated smell," she said. "Men rate the smell of meat the way women rate chocolate." We consumers seem to be growing a taste for perfumes inspired by potentially pungent scents.

‘"The French perfumer Etat Libre d'Orange introduced a product this year called Sécrétions Magnifiques that's supposed to smell like a mix of blood, sweat and various other body excretions," Herz said. "And the fashion designer Tom Ford has cologne called Black Orchid that he's said he intended to smell like a man's crotch."’ (Daum)

Many people find the concept of turning what was traditionally considered an odor and applying it to the human body highly offensive. Most of the people included in this group use a fragrant body spray themselves, not realizing that what they believe to be a pleasing augmentation to their natural odor, is in fact making people gag. Who makes the rule that while the lady sitting beside me can reek of White Rain, the guy who proudly flaunts his male underwear scent gets beaten up on the corner?

Certain scents, as well as certain hairstyles, religions, fashions, and many other aspects of human preference, can attract one set of people while simultaneously repelling another. Such is the cause and effect of individual expression and the consistent diversity of any one person’s personal taste.





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