Gifts This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine.

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   A child walks through a toy store enthusiastically as she sees all of the toys she had seen in commercials. A person can imagine that this place is just like heaven to this little girl. She unconsciously rips at her mother's jacket and points her finger at the newest Barbie. Her mother shushes her as she looks for a toy for a birthday party. The girl begins to cry, and whine, and her mother looks at her and calms her down by telling her she will get something later. The little girl perks up as she realizes she has conned her mother into buying her the doll, what she doesn't know is that the doll is not the greatest gift she could receive.

Denis Waitley said it best, "The greatest gifts you can give your children are the roots of responsibility and the wings of independence." I strongly agree. My parents, two tremendously influential people in my life, have proved this to be true. Along with the love, support, and encouragement, my parents have blessed me with two extremely vital gifts. These gifts are not materialistic like a doll; rather, they are moral gifts. Roots, being the first, act as a base or foundation for the future. The foundation compiles and is built stronger and thicker when elements such as support and responsibility are factors in making it stand. As a person matures and grows older, this past foundation helps people make the right and wise decisions as young adults and adults. A person expects independence and freedom with age, however, it should not be given unless the person is ready. With responsibility come wings, freedom, and independence teenagers yearn for.

The little girl arrives home and bounces off the walls in her excitement and wonderment at the gift her mother bought her. The mother reluctantly walks into the room, yet firmly tells her daughter to come and listen. She pulls a book and a pencil from the shopping bag. She tells her child to write her feelings and thoughts into this book. The little girl, not understanding, starts to cry because she didn't get the Barbie she wanted. Instead, the mother gave her an opportunity to write down her thoughts, her dreams and her goals. With the book and the pen come the responsibility of updating it. This child will later grow to follow her dreams first written down in her book, and she would eventually find that even the skies are not limits to her heart's desire. ?


This work has been published in the Teen Ink monthly print magazine. This piece has been published in Teen Ink’s monthly print magazine.






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