Changes | Teen Ink

Changes

March 9, 2015
By kdotdot, Cupertino, California
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kdotdot, Cupertino, California
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I had no memory of my past, which was weird because my parents told me all about how I acted and what I did as a child. They said I was a happy kid. I laughed and smiled all the time, but I just can’t remember and I start to question if it ever happened. The one sure thing I knew about my past was that I always carried around a box of different colored mints. But these mints weren’t just ordinary mints.
A week ago, we moved to a new state, California. I had to admit this place was beautiful. I had the perfect life you could say. I lived in a beach house, had wonderful parents, and of course, the mints. I was from Kansas, so I wasn’t used to the ocean. But the beauty of the Pacific Ocean amazed me. It was something I’ve never seen before. I wanted to go out and jump right in. I took my treasure box with me as I walked outside and touched the warm sand. I wondered how it’ll feel like when I jump in. I have never swam before. I took a deep breath and took out a blue mint. I quickly ate it and put my foot into the ocean. I yanked my left foot out because of the ice cold water. Stepping in felt like the water was piercing through my skin. I took another deep breath and slowly put my foot back in. Suddenly, I fell face first onto the Pacific. I screamed and kicked everywhere. I steadied myself and told myself to breathe in and breathe out. My best friend, Diana, told me that back in Kansas. I was breathing underwater! The mint worked! I opened my eyes too. Perfect vision. There weren’t any fish nearby, but a lot of dark green plants under water. Then, I thought about how someone or something pushed me. I looked up from below and saw a teenage boy. He was about my age, 14, sandy blonde hair, and sparkling blue eyes. I poked my head out of the water. There was no one there. Was my mind messing with me? I rubbed my eyes and glanced again. Again, there was nothing. I pulled myself back under water and swam with one hand grasping the box of mints. I swam for what seemed like forever. I finally decided to head back. I walked out of the ocean. I was surprised that I wasn’t wet, at all.
“Must be the mint,” I thought.
As I approached my house, I see police cars everywhere. I started to run faster and faster. Questions filled my head. What’s happening? Did someone get hurt? I was on a full-on sprint. I quickly ate a yellow mint to enhance my speed.  I reached the front door and found my mom crying and hugging my dad. My dad was talking to the police. Next to him was the boy who pushed me.
“Callie! Oh my gosh! Where have you been?” my mom screamed with tears rushing out.
“I was taking a swim. What’s going on?” I asked.
“Kyle,” my dad pointed at the boy, “said he pushed you into the water as a joke, but you disappeared as soon as you were pushed.”
“Well, if you are okay, we can go,” one of the policemen said.
“Yeah, I’m good,” I said.
The policemen gave me a smile and everyone left. In a matter of minutes, only my family and Kyle remained.
"I'm sorry. I didn't mean to push you so hard that you would have fallen. I just wanted to welcome you to the neighborhood by joking around," Kyle apologized.
"Great welcome," I muttered, " but it's fine."
"Well if you need someone to show you around, I live over there," he pointed right to the house where several Palm trees were.
Kyle smiled and then left. I liked the palm trees. It was something I see in pictures, but never in person.

The next day was my first day of school at San Diego High. It's never cool to be the new kid in the middle of the year. Everyone whispers about them and you never have any friends. I saw Kyle out of the corner of my eye. He was the only guy I knew here, so I decided to walk up to him.
"Hey," I greeted.
"Sup," Kyle smiled.
"Hey, who's this? Is she new?" one of Kyle's friend asked.
"Yeah, this is Callie. Callie, this is Connor," Kyle introduced.
We shook hands. He had dark green eyes with brownish black hair. He wore a gray flannel with dark jeans. Kyle wore a Nike t-shirt and shorts. All of a sudden, the bell rang.
"Hey, do you know where Mr. Tren's classroom is?" I asked.
"Oh yeah, I have him next follow me," Connor said as he started to walk to class.
History was the most boring subject in all. Like who cares about the past? We can learn from our own mistakes. Everyone kept glancing at me.
"Good morning class. We have a new student. Callie, why don't you come here and introduce yourself?" Mr. Tren asked.
I walked up to the front of the room. I was wearing black leggings with gray converse and a red flannel. Everyone was dead silent with their eyes glued to me.
"Hi, I'm Callie and I'm from Kansas. Um, I like to draw and sing," I said nervously.
I walked back to my seat in the back. I really wanted to know what they were thinking of me. Did they hate me already? I took out a pink mint and ate it.
"Wow that new kid has a different eye color. The left one is light green and the other one is dark blue," I heard.
I was used to people commenting on my eyes. It wasn't something you see everyday. On top of that, I had blonde straight hair with brown hilights.
The day went by slowly. Break and lunch were lonely. It was hard making friends on the first day. I decided to hang with Connor and Kyle because they were the only people I knew. As days past, I gained more and more friends and closer with Kyle and Connor.

One day I went to the beach for a swim. I took out a blue mint and ate it.
"Why do you always carry that around?" Kyle came running.
I didn't know whether to lie or tell the truth that these pills have magical powers that allow me to do impossible things. Yeah, let's stick to lying.
"Well, I don't know. I guess they taste pretty good," I lied.
"Mhm. Yeah, you're a pretty bad liar, Callie," Kyle laughed, " if you don't want to tell me it's all good. Look, I have to go . See you later."
I waved and when he was out of sight, I jumped into the ocean and swam out. I saw numerous sliver shiny fish. They were some red fish here and there. It was amazing having some alone time and relax. No stress, no new school, no people, just me. I popped my head out of the water to see how far I swam. I couldn't see the shore. I had a panic attack. I put my hands in my face and tried to calm down. Just swim back the direction you came in. Except where did I come from? Maybe one of my mints can teleport me to the shore or help me in some way. I looked at my hands. No mint box. I patted my clothes. No mint box.
"I MUST HAVE DROPPED IT!" I yelled in frustration.
How much longer did I have until the mint wears off? I can’t swim! It’ll be too cold! Oh god, what do I do? I decided to dive down and find my box. Deeper and deeper I went. I needed to reach the bottom of the ocean. The Pacific Ocean was pretty deep. I had to swim fast to reach the bottom before the mint wore off. I started to feel the pressure in my ears and body. The mint was wearing off. My vision started to blur. It felt like there was a tornado in the ocean. Everything was spinning. I had to reach the top. I swam and swam despite the dizzy feeling I had. At last, I reached the top and allowed a big gulp of oxygen to enter my lungs. I looked around  and saw a boat a couple miles away.
“HERE! OVER HERE!” I screamed as loud as I could.
They seemed to have heard me because they started coming my way. The closer they came, the dizzier I became. I fainted when I heard shouts coming from the boat.

I woke up in my bedroom on my bed. I felt dizzy and nauseous. I’ve never felt so sick. I reached for my mint box. Oh, right. I lost it. My mom came in with some chicken noodle soup.
“Thanks, mom,” I sighed.
“Are you okay? Besides the fact that you fainted in the ocean,” my mom asked.
“No, I lost my mint box. I feel terrible and tired,” I cried.
“You lost your mint box!” Mom screamed.
“Yeah,” I nodded.
“Get up. We have to go. Get ready in five minutes. I’m going to call Dad,” my mom ordered.
“Jeez. It’s just a mint box. I don’t want to get up. I told you I’m not feeling too well,” I rolled my eyes.
“Just get ready please,” Mom said.
I sighed and dressed myself. My legs could barely hold me up. I heard my mom calling my dad. In a matter of minutes, my dad was home and we were on the way to who knows where. I felt like the life in me was getting sucked out. I fell asleep.
“Dr. Holzman! Callie lost her mint box! She needs help immediately,” I heard my mom yell.
I felt arms around me, but I couldn’t open my eyes. I was just so tired. I realized someone was carrying me and was in a hurry. A couple minutes later, I was put onto a metal table. What was going on? I used all the energy left in me to open my eyes. Some doctor was hovering over me. And that was the last I saw until I blacked out.

I slowly began to open my eyes. Where was I? What happened? How long have I been out? I felt refreshed and new. The complete opposite I felt before. I looked around. I was in my room. I looked over at the table next to my bed, and there it was! My mints! How did that get there? I tried sitting up, but something seemed to be attached to my back. A wire? Why was it in me?
My mom walked in and gasped.
“You’re awake!” she said surprised.
“Why is this connected to me?” I asked.
My dad walked in and gasped too.
“She’s awake too early. She wasn’t supposed to see that,” my dad whispered.
“You know I can hear you, Dad. You aren’t a very good whisperer. What is this?” I pointed to the wire.
My parents glanced at each other. I knew that look.
“What is this?!” I demanded.
“Look, we meant to tell you this when we moved here, but then there was the whole police incident,” my mom began.
“Six years ago, Dr. Holzman gave us you to take care of. Don’t get me wrong, you’re still my daughter, and I will always love you like one. Those mints were energy boosters. I don’t know how to say this in the best way, so I’ll just say it. You’re not human. Not fully at least. Those mints give you the power you originally have. If you lose them, you’re energy becomes low, and you grow super tired like you were two days ago,” my dad finished.
“So I’m not you’re real daughter? Then why do I have this wire stuck in my back?” I yelled.
“It was the only way to get you back into yourself. You were supposed to rest for three days, but you woke up early,” Dad said.
“And if I didn’t wake up early, you wouldn’t have told me?” I cried.
“I’m sorry, Callie. We still love you like always,” Mom said.
I took a deep breath. Everything is still the same. Now I understood why I didn’t have memory of the past. I had no childhood. Everything made sense. I couldn’t be mad. I learned who I am. I guess that’s all I could ask for. What’s happened, happened. At least, I could look at this in a good way.



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