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It's not all about Being Remembered...or is it?

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Most people know that Reggie Jackson, also known as “Mr. October,” in one of the leaders in Major League Baseball with 563 homeruns. They also know that Dick Cheney was the 46th Vice President of the United States, and that Dr. Seuss is one of the most successful children’s writers of all time. These guys are obviously some of the best—they are # 1. But, what about when you’re not #1? What about people who don’t want to be remembered for being the best, but just the best they could be? Is it possible to be remembered—without ever standing out?

When I was a freshman, I made the Varsity cheer team, and I was ecstatic. I worked long and hard throughout both football and competitive season to earn a spot in all three rounds. Finally, in late January I reached my goal—I was put in round 3 as a flyer, and performed there for the rest of the season. That year, we placed 4th at state finals—and I had three more years left, and I couldn’t wait.

Well, guess what? It’s been three years, and the last time I was in round 3, was state finals of my freshman year. I got put in once my senior year when we had some sudden injuries, but was taken out immediately the next week. I struggled through the last few years not because I was not in all three rounds—but because I knew my best just wasn’t good enough. Nothing had changed in my attitude or work habit-the competition was just becoming tougher. When I look back on high school, I don’t regret not being in round 3-I regret being so tough on myself, and thinking I had done something wrong.

I have been in the SCHS cheerleading program for 4 years—and because of this, I know that I will leave some sort of legacy behind. When people think of me, I hope that they don’t think of the girl who was an okay flyer, but was only good enough to fly in round 3 her freshman year; or the girl who almost had her full, but was too scared to throw it; or the girl who was just there to write funny poems at the end of the year. I hope they think of someone who knew she wasn’t the best flyer, but worked just as hard at it anyways; or someone who tried harder and harder each week at gymnastics to perfect her skills; or someone who was always there with a little extra inspiration if you ever needed it. I hope that I’ve made an impact on people over the past few years. I hope that when I leave, people don’t just remember my name, but find that it’s impossible to forget.

Over the years, cheerleading has not taught me that with hard work comes success—it has taught me that with hard work comes reality. Because the reality of it is, sometimes you work your hardest, and still fall short of your goals. Over the past four years, I have learned to never settle for less than my best—but to accept the fact, that sometimes my best, might not be good enough. But you know what? That’s okay. Because in life, you don’t become a winner by being the best at everything you do—you become a winner by overcoming more obstacles than anymore else. Success doesn’t necessarily mean being a state champion—it means being a self champion.

Most people know that Reggie Jackson, also known as “Mr. October,” is one of the leaders in major league baseball in with 563 homeruns. They also know that Dick Cheney was the 46th Vice President of the United States, and that Dr. Seuss is one of the most successful children’s writers of all time. What they don’t know is that Mr. Jackson also leads Major League Baseball with 2,597 strikeouts. They also don’t know that Dick Cheney flunked out of Yale—twice, or that Dr. Seuss’ first book, “To Think I Saw it on Mulberry Street” was rejected 27 times before getting published. As for me, most people know that I’ve been on the Varsity Cheer Team for four years. But, most people don’t know that in the past few years, I’ve really felt like I haven’t been good enough to be on the team. But you know what? I bet at one point or another, Reggie Jackson, Dick Cheney, and Dr. Seuss all felt like they weren’t good enough either. These guys are some of the best—they are #1. And if some of the most successful people in the history of the United States haven’t been remembered for their imperfections, why should I be any different? You see, I don’t want to be remembered for being #1. I don’t want to be remembered as the greatest or the best—because that is simply a title. I want to be remembered for who I am—because THAT is a legacy.





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