Cope with Loss

By , Fort Worth, TX

It wasn’t the easiest lesson to learn at such a small age but I sure did learn it.  When I was at the innocent age of four I had a lively orange tabby who to my knowledge just showed up one day. I was kind of goofing around the house when I noticed her clawing at the door.  Wide eyed, I let her out not knowing that no one was supposed to let housepets out for coyotes have been hunting in neighborhoods because the fields were set on fire a week before.  At the time I didn’t think of the deathly consequences so I cheerfully let her out. After I while I thought she was coming back in but she never did           
           

I realized that week that I was confused on where my cat was, I didn’t know. I wondered and I wondered and then my brother tried to comfort me the only way a 9 year old knew how


“The cat’s dead”


I did not know what that meant so I asked for more information.


“She’s gone”
“Oh, ok”
        

I did not understand the severity of the situation I just thought she left. I was too young.
             

Then after a week I actually discovered where my cat actually was.  My brother found now crimson fur near our house, and some parts untainted looking tabby colored fur.

         

Years later when I found out what “Dead” actually meant I cried, something I didn’t do when I thought she was just gone. It was a new feeling for me. I knew what it felt like to lose something I cared about. A feeling am thankful for learning early.
    
Every person no matter who knows or knew someone who died. it’s part of life and if they haven’t they will.  Knowing how to deal with it can make or break a person. I dealt with my first death ignorantly and thankful for that because I don’t think I could’ve dealt with it at the time. Everyone deals with loss and has to accept it in their own ways.
       
 






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