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Blood, Sweat, & Tears

Something special was going to happen to me. To some people, the surprise may not sound exciting, but to my 7-year-old self, the surprise was like Christmas. My heart was jumping in excitement when I learned from my mother that I was going to learn how to play the piano from her. If I learned to play it I could play some of my parents’ favorite music like the “Moonlight Sonata” or even play beautiful music to my family creating them to have pride in their daughter for being able to play with amazing skill. However, little did I know that I had to face some hardships from the choice I had to make.
 

On the first day of lesson from my mother, I tried my best to learn, but after 5 minutes, I was impatient. I wondered, ‘Why did I have to play boring exercises? I want to start playing like a professional piano player!’ Frustration and anger boiled inside me. I did not want to play the piano. It was too chaotic, and I had to move both of my hands to play music. I could not use one finger or even one hand. My mother played me “Fur Elise” to show me how the piano sounds like and how it looks like to play it, but all I could concentrate on was how hectic playing the piano the piano was moving both hands from one side of the piano to the other to play “Fur Elise”.
  One day, in the car, my mother asked me if I wanted to continue playing the piano or want to play the violin. What was the choice I made? I decided that I wanted to play the violin because it was easy to carry and seemed less hectic than playing the piano. I was eager this time that I was going to play an instrument that was less chaotic, and I could play music anywhere. I could not lug a piano to my neighbor’s house and start playing there, but I could do that with a violin with little effort.
 

I was taken to violin lessons, and things started to get messy. In the beginning, learning the violin was enjoyable. I got to learn how to play one of my favorite songs “Twinkle Twinkle Little Star”. After about a few weeks, I was getting tired of playing the violin. I had trouble with getting having the right rhythm of the music, and my intonation or sound of the music was off. I had cried in frustration that I could not play well quickly like some talented people could do. However, my father made me listen to I got to learn one of my favorite songs like “Twinkle Twinkle Little Star”. Although, as time passed by, I had a hard time getting the right rhythm and the right intonation or pitch of different types of music. At home, sometimes I cried in frustration that I could not play the violin. However, my mother kept encouraging me that I could do it and said that I played beautifully. Did I give up on violin? Nope, I just needed a push to get me back on track, and I worked very hard to reach my goal, being able to play sweet music on the instrument. I tried to practice thirty minutes each day and sometimes forty-five minutes.
 

Years went by, and I enjoy playing the violin today for pleasure. I am glad that I chose to play it because if I learned to play the piano, I could not be in the school orchestra and not have the experience to be in DCYO, an orchestra group. I also got to play in a few recitals in Wayne Art Center and JC Music because of the violin. Without my mother to support me, I would have not found a way to release my stress or found one of my interests.




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