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Everyday...

She stares out towards the red bricks and concrete pavement between the buildings. The paved streets ahead of her are pockmarked with fragments of grass stems finding their way through the cracks. She can see little hints of yellow and green in a sea of solid black. Her feet continue to push forward until they are forced to stop by a large precipice with a set of white columns and balcony on which a gold painted eagle rests. Nevertheless the mansion doorway acts not like a painless gateway to a to a blissful place, but much more like a ravine, with swirling currents of people and the potential for death if one were to jump into it without caution. Her feet are slowed down as if roots are holding her to the ground, or the wind is pushing her back, yet she reaches for her stamina and continues slushing through the waves that appear to break at her feet. This force against her is not mother nature however–its the crowd that, like her, is attempting to squabble through the doorway. The baboons, having returned to their primeval behavior, advance harshly through the confined opening in the wall–these are the students of her High School. After being freed from the grip of the apparently enclosing entrance, they proceed, thundering through the building's caves–the narrow hallways with protruding lockers and obstacles meant to induce what they call learning. These caves are splattered with additional gullies, doorways that appear to have been widened from the rush of students and teachers in and out of the rooms they guard. It smells like a prison, decayed by the critters and roaches that scavenge their way within the walls. On the grey tiled steps throughout the building, a grotesque bug massacre can be found, like the jellyfish that wash up on the coast, minus the freedom that beaches give you of course. The winding stairs and twisted hallways, shaped like crescents, establish both a physical roller-coaster and an emotional one–high school.




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